• Poker Books: 5 Books in 1

  • Beginner's Guide + Tips and Tricks + Simple and Effective Strategies + Best Practices + Advanced Strategies
  • By: Kevin Bailey
  • Narrated by: William Bahl
  • Length: 4 hrs and 24 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (50 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

In 2017, the World Series of Poker Champion walked away with more than eight million dollars in cash. The total for the entire event was twice that. Where do you want to be in 2018? If you are interested in getting started playing poker, well then, Poker Books: 5 Books in 1 is what you have been waiting for.

Inside, you will find a number of useful practices that are sure to serve you well every time you sit down at a table. It doesn’t matter if you are looking to improve your pre-flop strategy, ability to determine pot odds, ease with which you can steal blinds, or more, this audiobook has the details you need. Not only will you learn the right plays to make at the right times, but you will learn the theory behind the motions as well, thanks to easily explained and detailed examples.

Dozens of new players make it to the World Series of Poker every year; 2018 could be your year. So, what are you waiting for? Take control of your financial future and get this audiobook today!

Inside you will find:

  • Everything you ever wanted to know about equity and how you can turn it to your advantage even in subpar situations
  • The true value of the speculative hand and what it can mean for your pre-flop strategy
  • A list of the most useful pot odds to know and when and why they come in handy
  • The most effective way to take advantage of reverse implied odds
  • The best ways to target weak players and profit from the experience
  • And more....

Buy this five-book bundle today and learn the intricacies of poker.

©2018 Kevin Bailey (P)2018 K.M. Kassi

What listeners say about Poker Books: 5 Books in 1

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

This course is worth its weight in chips.

I've been an intermediate player for years. I won some back before "black Friday." However, I could never really understand why certain players were just able to own me.

I haven't played regularly in several years and have recently decided to play more often. I bought this course as a "refresher."

These days you can’t hardly sit down at a poker table without hearing the term Game Theory Optimal (GTO). The fact that it gets thrown around with several different terms means it can be difficult to determine exactly what it is all about. Basically, it can be used in reference to considering situations based on their probability, range and results as well as in relation to opponent modeling. Regardless of the game, there is a mathematical GTO solution which explains why it has become the dominant framework among the professionals when it comes to the ideal poker strategy.

Essentially, GTO is about finding a strategy that makes it harder for your opponents to push you around in a game while also making it easier to get them to do what you want them to do. To understand how it comes into play during a typical poker hand, consider the following basic example. This example is known as the prisoner’s dilemma and essentially it says that two people are arrested for the same crime and then offered a choice. They can either admit that the other person committed the crime, in which case they will go free and the other prisoner will get a harsh sentence or stay silent and receive a light sentence. If both parties talk then they will both receive the harsh sentence. This means the best solution is not to talk, but only if they can count on the other person to do the same.

When you come across a player who is trying to influence your play, the natural response is to react and try to counter their strategy which can make it seem as though GTO is not especially useful. In actuality, assuming another player has a strategy and then striving to counter it is the essence of GTO.

It is so much more than a refresher. The sections on 3-betting, isolation raising, and over-limping (not limping too often, but limping after others have limped) have already transformed my game from a slight winner to a consistent winner.

It's only been over a relatively small sample size, but when I realized a few big mistakes I was making and corrected them, the results were immediately obvious.

Thank you so much, Kevin. As a poker lover for over a decade, I really can't express enough how much I appreciate you making this course.

25 people found this helpful

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I was a pro player (7 card stud) 10 years ago.


My course expectations were all met. I was looking for a comprehensive Poker course that would provide material that creates a solid set of fundamentals that I would be able to build on via additional study and experience through regular game play.

I was very impressed with the presentation materials and format of the course. There is a significant amount of material in this course. There is so much material it can at times be overwhelming without deliberate pauses and review. Due to the large amount of material, I found it was better to go through the material at a slower place.

Contrary to popular belief, this game did not exist in the 19th century wild west we think about when the game is mentioned. There is no clear-cut origin of the games inventor, though it is known that the game did start in Texas in the early 1900’s. The Texas State Legislature has officially recognized Robstown, Texas as the birthplace of Texas Hold ‘em. It steadily grew in popularity until it found its way to Las Vegas by way of a few down on their luck gamblers, Crandell Addington, Doyle Brunson, and Amarillo Slim. These men would not be down on their luck for long though, as they have each made a legacy of their names. Crandell Addington helped create the World Series of Poker and is a member of the Poker Hall of Fame. Doyle Brunson has played poker professionally for over 50 years, he is a two-time World Series of Poker Main Event champion, an inductee into the Poker Hall of Fame, and has authored several books on the art of poker. Amarillo Slim, also known as Thomas Austin Preston, Jr., has likewise cham
pioned the World Series of Poker and is inducted into the Poker Hall of Fame, his death in 2012 was a blow to the world of poker. He authored two books on poker and lives on through his work.

The game took a huge leap in popularity in 1970, the same year two major casinos opened in Vegas. It was soon the main event in poker tournaments across the country. In 1972, the very first World Series of Poker took place with only 8 players, it didn’t take long for that figure to jump up, and in thirty years, it would see 800 players enter the tournament. In time the game would reach such popularity that it would become a major part of mainstream television.
The word “poker” comes from a conglomerate of languages. It is said that it is likely descended from the Irish “poca” meaning “pocket”, or the French “poque” which is descended from the German “pochen” meaning “to brag as a bluff.” Despite the clear similarity to the names, it is unclear if the game is a descendant of these games the words describe or just borrowed for the sake of familiarity. Undoubtedly the oldest of the variants covered in this book, five card draw can be traced back to 1829, though, back in the years of its creation, the game was played with a twenty-card deck and a maximum of four players betting on which hand was the most valued without the option to trade cards with the dealer. It was first written about by English actor Joseph Cowell, who witnessed a group of men playing around a table in New Orleans, Louisiana.
The game waned in popularity after community card poker games were invented and today, it is not common to see it played in casinos, but is loved enough to be seen in play with family and friends.

Instead of cramming the material, I recommend taking some extra time and incorporate dedicated time for actual poker play and deliberate practice. I would then review previously viewed lessons and allow the material to be reinforced through actual experience where I attempted to utilize the course information. This allows for an ability to learn the info, apply it, then review and gain additional insight and perspective after applying what was learned. I found this to be the best method of learning for me since the information was still fresh and easy to recall.

I would recommend this course to any beginner Poker player that wants to improve their game by increasing their understanding of Poker strategy, patterns, player types, and best practices.

22 people found this helpful

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Puts it all together

While your technical poker playing skills may be top-notch, it takes more than that to be successful at the game in the long term. In fact, one of the main reasons that many poker players remain middling despite years of experience is that they have the wrong mindset from the start and never realize the problem and, as such, never get around to correcting it. These mental roadblocks aren’t insurmountable, they just require the right understanding of the game in order to push past them to the success you are looking for.

What this means is that the emotional, psychological and mental aspects of the game are just as important as any other tips and tricks you might learn along the way. In fact, much of the money that is lost at the poker table is due to weak mindsets, bad reactions, poor attitudes and generally wooly thinking. These issues can even affect those who are otherwise very calm and forward-thinking, as they can sit down at the table only to suddenly find themselves emotional, illogical or just plain deluded. Whenever you sit down to play it is important to keep in mind that poker players aren’t robots which means that emotions play as much of a part in the process as sheer technical prowess.

One of the main things that sets the greatest poker players in the world apart from everyone else is that they have a competitive nature that is highly developed, tempered by a strong positive self-belief. The variance that is found in every hand of poker can make it easy to turn fatalistic, full of self-doubt and generally negative about your skills and your future successes. This means that it is important to retain a belief in yourself in order to see each game through effectively.

16 people found this helpful

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This Book Has Made Me Better At Poker

I used to play a ton of poker (without ever getting good :-) ) Recently got back into poker and thought I'd give it a go, just to brush up on the basics. One of the problems with poker training is that while there's a ton of stuff all over the internet, it's rare to find, in one place, a comprehensive overview of the most important concepts for a beginner to concentrate on but that's exactly what Kevin Bailey has done in my opinion. The best part of poker is the combination of skills that are needed to survive a game, in this chapter, we will learn the ten different hands and where they rank in application. These are listed from weakest hand, to strongest hand, in that order. 1.) High card: High card is the highest card you have in your hand, and is never considered to be a good bet. 2.) Pair: Any two cards that have the same numerical value. 3.) Two Pair: Two sets of pairs (a pair of pairs.) 4.) Three-of-a-kind: Any three cards that have the same numerical value. 5.) Straight: A progression of numerical values in sequential rank of five cards in a row in at least two different suits. 6.) Flush: Five cards of the same suit. 7.) Full House: consists of three-of-a-kind and one pair. 8.) Four-of-a-kind: Any four cards that have the same numerical value. 9.) Straight Flush: A progression of numerical values in sequential rank of five cards in a row in a single suit. 10.) Royal Flush: Technically a straight flush, which consists of the ten, jack, queen, king, and ace of the same suit. It's a really good course which will get you up and running with a solid strategy to get started with. Of course, poker is an incredibly deep rabbit hole that you can get lost in if you're not careful. With Kevin's course that's very unlikely to happen. I also really like the combination of theory lectures mixed with plenty of 'actual hand' analysis - a mix of live play and looking at hands in the replayer. I'm almost embarrassed to have got this for free (bought two of his books as a way of saying Thanks!) Many Thanks, Kevin Bailey. The ordinary player who wants to play poker for fun must overcome the first hurdle that is the knowledge of the game, once you feel you are a master of the cards- at least to some extent- you will be a skillful adversary to your friends and even to the sharks at the casino. Having the feeling of assurance about your game will make it possible for you to excerpt the full potential of all of the pleasures that poker can give, and that pleasure is considerable when your pockets are lined with profits.

14 people found this helpful

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Get Inside the Mind of a Poker Genius

Reading your opponent is no simple task, it takes time, do not expect to understand your opponent’s playing style in the first hand. Take mental notes of each hand played and keep initial betting to a minimum until it is more clear how your opponent plans their moves. There are several “tells” that may indicate your opponent has a strong hand; keep an eye out for these and attempt to avoid them, unless attempting to strategically use them for a bluff. These “tells” include suddenly fluid speech, shaking hands, relaxed disposition, a full smile, unblinking eyes, inconsistent staring, deep breathing, red face, impatience, enlarged pupils, and careful protecting of their hold cards. These are all examples of physical tells, and may or may not be applicable to your opponent, to understand which, if any, are being utilized. It is a good idea to watch your opponent’s betting patterns to get a better idea of which physical tells they may exhibit. There are also tells for weak hands, these include confused speech, holding of breath, forcing bets, consistent staring, checking hold cards frequently, breathing through mouth, pouting lips, firm upper lip, biting tongue or lip, tongue in cheek, covering mouth, squinting eyes, rolling eyes, phony smiles, crossing arms, and shaking legs.

11 people found this helpful

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I’m impressed!

Desire and willingness to learn will come naturally to the reader of this book, after all, you’re reading this book. No matter how often you practice, you will not get any better unless you are aggressively thinking about what your opponent’s next move will be. Even more importantly, you must pursue strategies from players with more skill than you, this can be done without playing by simply watching experienced players enjoy the game. Emotional control is a factor of upmost importance. Human emotion is ranked on a spectrum and is generally ill equipped to deal with probability, randomness, and deception. The ability to control your emotions to make logical progressive play for every round of betting is one of the most difficult things to do in poker. Social and networking skills are imperative for every player, it will open doors to games that you otherwise would not be a part of and permit you to make acquaintances with stronger players who can assist you with improving your skills. Finally, to be a truly advanced poker player, you must have a strong will to gamble, a great player must be willing to face stakes that are more advanced than they are used to. It is important to apply the other five personality traits to this trait with extreme caution and control, or face going broke.

8 people found this helpful

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Get your poker math under control!

Though churning of emotions can run high in poker, intimidation is often your best friend. If you are losing multiple hands, pack up, and move to a different table, no poker player will be intimidated by a player who is not beating them to the punch. Intimidation bets only work when the player making them has emotional control of the table, therefore, it is often best to use this tactic only after you’ve won a few hands. If your opponents are being timid and insecure with their bets, you may consider intimidation bets as a means to an end. If your opponents are deceiving or enthused, making an intimidation bet is a bad idea. When you have a winning hand, the process of betting takes a different role. In order to achieve a profit, you need your opponents to place bets, and in order for your opponents to place bets, you need to make them believe they can win. When it is your turn to take action, it is imperative that you raise the wager. The most common mistake that beginners make is attempting to lure in their opponents when they have a strong hand by merely checking or calling, a misguided attempt to make a final round of heavy betting. Instead, place wagers based on your observations of your opponents. If you have what you believe to be a winning hand, always raise when your round of betting approaches relative to your observations of the other players on the table. Do not miss out on an opening to maximize your profits by playing it slow. Do not be frustrated if your opponent folds when you have a great hand, take that information and learn from it so the next opportunity will play out to your advantage. In the long run, you make more money from raising the wager when you have a great hand, even if the other players call less often.


4 people found this helpful

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Five star

Best author creation and the book is very useful for poker players.Practically everybody plays poker it’s simply an issue of how fortunate you are or how great you are on foreseeing on the off chance that you will win or lose.

2 people found this helpful

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interesting guide

This is an interesting guide on Poker. I find it difficult to play Poker until i get this book that shows me some wonderful tips and tricks on the easy way to play Poker.

1 person found this helpful

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its great

This is the most thorough and detailed poker game book I've read. This book fills in a lot of the blanks for the beginner. No excused after reading this one!

1 person found this helpful

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  • Lucy Fowler
  • 06-08-20

Sooo good.

so far so good; one of the best complete poker courses out there; worth the money. The true value of the speculative hand and what it can mean for your pre-flop strategy.

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  • Hall
  • 06-03-20

Known as the madman of poker!

I enjoyed everything it has to offer, specially the hand analysis and the live play. I think I have improved my game significantly and I feel very motivated to practice and learn more.

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