• Summary

  • Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post. For your ears. Martine Powers is your host, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays by 5 p.m. Eastern time.
    © The Washington Post
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Episodes
  • May 20 2022

    After the murder of George Floyd, reporters Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa spent months learning everything they could about Floyd’s life. The story they reveal in a new book shows how systemic racism shaped and shortened it. 


    Read more:


    “He's everywhere — but he's not here. He's on somebody's wall. He's on somebody's billboard. … He's in a newspaper, but he's not here. He's here in spirit. But he's not here.”

     

    In the summer of 2020, after George Floyd was murdered, he became a symbol and a rallying cry. But what was missing in our understanding was the man himself — a figure who was complicated, full of ambition, shaped by his family and his community and centuries of systemic racism. 

     

    The Washington Post set out to better understand who Floyd really was and reported a series of stories about George Floyd’s America. We made a podcast based on this reporting, “The Life of George Floyd,” which we’re playing today for you in full. But two of the reporters on that project still had questions. 

     

    Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa have now written a book that delves deeper into Floyd’s life — what he was like as a father, a boyfriend, a classmate, an athlete, how ambitious he was. And how those ambitions were hobbled by systemic racism. They learned about things that happened to Floyd’s family, hundreds of years before he was born, that shaped everything that would happen to him later. 

     

    If you’d like to read an excerpt of Robert and Tolu’s book, you can find that here: How George Floyd Spent His Final Hours.

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    1 hr and 16 mins
  • May 19 2022

    A year ago today, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott signed into law Texas Senate Bill 8, also known as the Texas Heartbeat Act. The law bans abortion after about six weeks of pregnancy — before many people even know they’re pregnant. It also employed a novel legal strategy that empowered ordinary people to enforce the law by suing anyone who may have helped facilitate the abortion.


    Many observers thought the law would be blocked from taking effect or overturned after passing. That didn’t happen. The Supreme Court had three opportunities to consider the law and didn’t, signaling that the court could be open to overturning Roe v. Wade


    In the recent uproar over the leaked Supreme Court draft opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, it’s been easy to forget about the impact and significance of Texas’s law. But a year later the law still stands in the state, blocking abortions after about six weeks. 


    Today on Post Reports, on the anniversary of the Texas abortion ban, national political reporter Caroline Kitchener brings us the story of the activist who helped to craft the law, the doctor who tried to challenge it, and the lessons both sides have taken away from its success.


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    Caroline Kitchener examines whether a national abortion ban is possible in a post-Roe world. 


    You can also read her profile of Dr. Alan Braid

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    32 mins
  • May 18 2022

    Today on Post Reports, an estimated 1.5 million retirees have reentered the U.S. labor market over the past year. What’s bringing them back?


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    Millions of Americans who retired during the pandemic are returning to the workforce.


    Many are being lured back to work by more flexible, hybrid work arrangements and declining concerns over covid. And, yes, some of it is also being driven by high inflation. But there’s good news, too: Ageism might be less of a problem for older workers. Companies are scrambling to find experienced, reliable people to fill all these open jobs. And suddenly, the AARP set is looking pretty good.

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    13 mins

Featured Article: Politics Audiobooks and Podcasts You Should Be Listening to in 2021


Every aspect of our lives as American citizens—from education to law and justice, from healthcare to financial stability—is directly impacted by the systems that rule us and the leaders who guide us. No matter where you lie on the political spectrum, getting engaged and exercising your civic duty begins with listening. The collection below offers works of nonfiction that shed new light on our democratic process.

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why aren't these things clearly dated?

my library is full of these but they are transitory in value and context is unclear

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Great Insight

I enjoy hearing in-depth reporting and hearing the story beyond the story reported in the paper.

Being a news-junkie, listening while preparing dinner is a real highlight to my day.

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I miss the digest

Every morning I knew I could catch up on what was going on in the country and the world AND get world class comments and opinions. Now… I get a short podcast on one subject. They are, in all honesty, well done. I just miss the news summary.

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Sad substitute for digest

Pretty lame substitute for what what once the full Washington Post digest.

Lacks breadth and ads are fairly annoying.