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Publisher's Summary

In this captivating story about loss, love, and changing your ways, National Book Award-winning author Pete Hautman imbues the classic road trip novel with clever wit and heartfelt musings about life and death. 

Steven Gerald Gabel - a.k.a. Stiggy - needs to get out of Minnesota. His father recently look his own life, his mother is a shell of the person she used to be, and his sort-of-girlfriend ghosted him and skipped town. What does he have left to stick around for? Armed with his mom's credit card and a tourist map of Great River Road, Stiggy sets off in his dad's car. The only problem is, life on his own isn't exactly what he expected, and, soon enough, he finds himself at a crossroads: keep running from his demons, or let them hitch a ride back home with him.

©2019 Pete Hautman (P)2019 Recorded Books

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Meh

The portagonist is insufferable. There's a difference between reading about a flawed character and whatever this kid was. He never learned what not to say. Well maybe he did by the end. I couldn't finish it, but I was very close. He hadn't shown progress by the time I quit, so if he in fact learned from his mistakes it was to late to make the story compelling.
I also didn't love the narration, but it might be more the words that he has to read than the performance it self. Except every time "Okay" somehow always scrunching his shoulders..
Usually this kind of book would've been right up my alley, but I never seemed to actually enjoy it.