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Publisher's Summary

From the team that brought you the New York Times best-selling Dry comes a riveting new thriller that proves when gods play games, even love is a lie.​

The freeway is coming.

It will cut the neighborhood in two. Construction has already started, pushing toward this corridor of condemned houses and cracked concrete with the momentum of the inevitable. Yet there you are, in the fifth house on the left, fighting for your life.

Ramey, I.

The victim of the bet between two manufactured gods: the seductive and lethal Roxy (Oxycontin), who is at the top of her game, and the smart, high-achieving Addison (Adderall), who is tired of being the helpful one and longs for a more dangerous, less wholesome image. The wager - a contest to see who can bring their mark to “the Party” first - is a race to the bottom of a rave that has raged since the beginning of time. And you are only human, dazzled by the lights and music. Drawn by what the drugs offer - tempted to take that step past helpful to harmful…and the troubled places that lie beyond.

But there are two I Rameys - Isaac, a soccer player thrown into Roxy’s orbit by a bad fall and a bad doctor, and Ivy, his older sister, whose increasing frustration with her untreated ADHD leads her to renew her acquaintance with Addy.

Which one are you?

©2021 Neal and Jarrod Shusterman. All rights reserved. (P)2021 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

What listeners say about Roxy

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Very powerful

Very effective of showing the glitter and dark side of drugs. Loved the real names that brings the drugs to life. My only issue was not being sure what name always went to the drugs. I am glad the Shusterman’s bring this horrible issue in life to help stop this drug cycle that has plagued the world since drugs entered the medical world.

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Sometimes cheesy but worth the read

I've read all of Neal's books, not just the popular ones, and this fits. I think he learned his lesson from Game Changer, and the book is less "down your throat" political.

The story is told from the perspective of characters, as well as from the perspective of personified drugs (which can be cheesy at times). I can't tell if it's because I'm getting older now (24) or just because it's relatively cheesy in general. HOWEVER, I will say that it's executed very well. Adderall and Morphine being the most well written in my opinion.

If you like his writing style, you'll like the book. Similar "feels" to Dry, being in a modern setting with real world issues.

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Brilliant but RUFF

This is pharmacology meets American Gods, so I present to you American Meds. Creative, empathetic, and heartbreaking, this book takes a novel approach of addressing teens, the opiate crisis, and addiction in general. This is grim as hell, but a very worthwhile read. Have tissues.

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captivating

couldn't stop listening. Pretty creative and captivating idea to personify drugs the way they did in this book.

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I'm honestly struggling to finish this...

...and I hate to have to say that because I REALLY wanted to love this book. As a recovering opioid addict this is a subject that is very important to me so when I read the description of this story I was intrigued, to say the least. I'm 24 chapters in & the only reason I'm finishing it is because I hate to give up on a book & I'm hoping it gets better. Not only do the narrators drive me crazy (more often than not they whisper & I can't hear what they're saying so I turn it all the way up, only to have them return to their normal voices & burst my eardrums) but the storyline is getting very convoluted & it's really confusing. Like...

*possible spoiler alert if you haven't read the whole book*

How are Addison & Roxy falling in love with Ivy & Isaac? I think the idea of personifying drugs is a really great idea, it's just the execution that needs work. Plus, there are A LOT of clichés that are just really cheesy.

I'm appreciative of the fact that Neal & Jarrod wrote about a subject that everyone should learn as much as possible about, I just really wish I liked it more. (Although...this could have something to do with the fact that I just finished The Arc of the Scythe series & nothing will ever live up to that.) I would recommend this book, just don't go into it with your hopes too high.