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Publisher's Summary

Between 1917 and 1921, a devastating struggle took place in Russia following the collapse of the Tsarist empire. Many regard this savage civil war as the most influential event of the modern era. An incompatible White alliance of moderate socialists and reactionary monarchists stood little chance against Trotsky's Red Army and Lenin's single-minded Communist dictatorship. Terror begat terror, which in turn led to even greater cruelty with man's inhumanity to man, woman and child. The struggle became a world war by proxy as Churchill deployed weaponry and troops from the British empire, while armed forces from the United States, France, Italy, Japan, Poland and Czechoslovakia played rival parts.   

Using the most up-to-date scholarship and archival research, Antony Beevor, author of the acclaimed international best seller Stalingrad, assembles the complete picture in a gripping narrative that conveys the conflict through the eyes of everyone, from the worker on the streets of Petrograd to the cavalry officer on the battlefield and the woman doctor in an improvised hospital.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2022 Antony Beevor (P)2022 Weidenfeld & Nicolson
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

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  • Mr J Coates
  • 06-24-22

Hard Going!

This is both a wonderful and terrible book at the same time. Wonderfully comprehensive, written and narrated. Terrible in hearing of man's total depravity sinking lower than animals. I listened to it travelling around the Highlands of Scotland and Isle of Skye where the contrast between the beauty of God's creation and man's barbarity was made so much the more stark. I would highly recommend this book but be prepared for the hard going of its theme.

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  • djmp
  • 06-25-22

Superb analysis

Lays bare the cruelty of Civil War, the extreme Bolshevik methods, subsequent Nazi "learning"

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  • Kuma
  • 06-15-22

A compelling, energetic and enjoyable history

This is a tremendous effort by Beevor to narrate a period of history that is both complex, at times heart breaking and always relentless.

The text is well organised and captures the international aspects of the conflict. It offers an unvarnished view of all sides superbly.

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  • Doc Smith
  • 06-17-22

A Chronicle of Barbarity

Beevor meticulously chronicles the vast panoply of the hugely destructive war(s) between Russians and dozens of smaller nations, nationalities and ethnicities. Although more of a political than military history it would have nonetheless benefited from greater detail of the major decisive battles, particularly in the latter half of the civil war. Some statistics to flesh out the scale of losses would have helped more than relentless descriptions of barbarity that became almost repetitive by the final chapters. But these are minor quibbles when viewing the enormous scope of the truly awful conflict that Beevor describes. The huge array of characters on all sides (there were often more than just Whites and Reds!) is brought together and narrated, often by their own writing in a compelling way not previously seen in histories of this now remote but crucially important period of modern history.