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Publisher's Summary

Simulated reality is the hypothesis that reality could be simulated - for example by quantum computer simulation - to a degree indistinguishable from "true" reality. It could contain conscious minds which may or may not be fully aware that they are living inside a simulation. This is quite different from the current, technologically achievable concept of virtual reality. Virtual reality is easily distinguished from the experience of actuality; participants are never in doubt about the nature of what they experience. Simulated reality, by contrast, would be hard or impossible to separate from "true" reality. There has been much debate over this topic, ranging from philosophical discourse to practical applications in computing. 

The version of the simulation hypothesis was first theorized as a part of a philosophical argument on the part of René Descartes. Later, the philosopher Nick Bostrom developed an expanded argument examining the probability of our reality being a simulation. 

His argument states that at least one of the following statements is very likely to be true: 

  1. Human civilization is unlikely to reach a level of technological maturity capable of producing simulated realities or such simulations are physically impossible to construct.
  2. A comparable civilization reaching aforementioned technological status will likely not produce a significant number of simulated realities (one that might push the probable existence of digital entities beyond the probable number of "real" entities in a Universe) for any of a number of reasons, such as diversion of computational processing power for other tasks, ethical considerations of holding entities captive in simulated realities, etc.
  3. Any entities with our general set of experiences are almost certainly living in a simulation.
  4. We are living in a reality in which posthumans haven't developed yet and we are actually living in reality.
©2018 Austin Waters (P)2018 Austin Waters

What listeners say about Simulation Theory Explained: Are We Living in a Simulation?

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Are you real ?

This is a good overview of Simulation Theory.It is a concise
explanation of the possibility of our existence being based on some
type of Matrix scenario.

The use of advanced Quantum Computers or other type of Computer or
Computer related Technology with enormous storage and memory capacity beyond even the Theory of our current state of Technology.The narrator did a good job in presenting the Theory.


This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

11 people found this helpful

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Too "Culty" For Me

I was not a fan of this book. I thought it would be an informational piece on what simulation theory is. But, as I found out after listening, you're better off just reading the Wikipedia page. Literally, the intro to the Wikipedia page IS the description for this book... The arguments in this book were, for the most part, flawed at best. They can be summarized as follows: There are patterns in nature, and elements in life that are sort of like simulations that we run; therefore, our lives must be a simulation.

To me, that's a chicken or the egg argument. The author compared two things, and just chose which came first. Many of the other "points" and "evidence" were just ramblings and random thoughts. At one point, the author snuck in a statement that these were only "suggested evidence", then kept on going.

It got a bit cult-like when the author stated that since there are no good new creations now, that we must be near the end of time, and that our existence will be soon coming to an abrupt end. "But do not worry, it is going to be better". That, followed by "life means continuity, and death is not the end, just an exit from this world...". At this point I realized I was not a fan of the reader either. Up until that point I was not bothered (I listened to the sample, and didn't mind it then).

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

1 person found this helpful

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Descarte’s Demon gets a Digital Update

What should have been presented as an interesting philosophical exercise in epistemology and metaphysics, verged on conspiracy theory.

Doubting the evidence of your senses is helpful for an experiment, but the author offers no way out of the matrix. He didn’t even offer Descarte’s path out of the cloud of unknowing.

This is an interesting idea with some fresh insight into new angles that technology could yield on an age old problem of escaping Plato’s cave, but he brought in crop circles as proof that we are living in a computer simulation. I wasn’t convinced.

The narrator did a great job and this gave some fun brain candy to chew on, just don’t let it rot your neurons.

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review

1 person found this helpful

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Misleading title

This is does not cover the general philosophy simulation theory, rather the authors beliefs and views strung together about it. Mildly entertaining. Pay close attention to the reviews. Had it been appropriately described, not a bait and switching, I would have been inclined to give a higher rating.

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Perfect for lunch break Quick n thought provoking

Wasn't very long and I already knew what he was talking about. I was hoping to hear something new to think about. But it was really cool for a 30 minute quick book. Perfect for a lunch break.

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informational

I enjoyed the book very much the only bad thing was some of the things he said to prove we live in a simulation seemed more like a theories than facts, despite implying they were factual.

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terribly

nothing of use here in this book!!!! what a waste of time, nothing learned but someone's thoughts!

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good not great

for the most part the book checked all the boxes but lost me at crop circles

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  • N
  • 03-13-19

A Free Lunch Indeed

“Now, now, Bartimaeus, we don’t use the s-word in civilized company, do we? Jabor and I are playing the long game.”

Excerpt From
The Amulet of Samarkand: A Bartimaeus Novel, Book 1
Jonathan Stroud
https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewBook?id=489210223
This material may be protected by copyright.


  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars

somewhat useful

good introduction, but very short and not all evidence was equally compelling or explained. still it has value for an obscure topic.

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  • Nick
  • 11-20-19

Reliance upon logical fallacies

One false dilemma leading to a domino effect of ideas explains a subjective point of view.

I found fewer facts and more personal ideas presented as truths than I was hoping for.

1 person found this helpful