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Publisher's Summary

In Slavery and the Coming of the Civil War, the authors explain the occurrences in America during the thirty years between 1831 and 1861. This book discusses the attitudes and events that led up to and caused the Civil War in America, particularly the institution of slavery, the Abolitionist movement, and the rise of Abraham Lincoln.

History is dramatic - and the renowned, award-winning authors Christopher Collier and James Lincoln Collier demonstrate this in a compelling series aimed at young listeners. Covering American history from the founding of Jamestown through present day, these volumes explore far beyond the dates and events of a historical chronicle to present a moving illumination of the ideas, opinions, attitudes, and tribulations that led to the birth of this great nation.

©2013 James Lincoln Collier & Christopher Collier (P)2013 AudioGO

What listeners say about Slavery and the Coming of the Civil War: 1831 - 1861

Average Customer Ratings
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Whitewashing of History

I really wanted to like this book. The prolog got me excited because I liked the idea of focusing on a period of time and learning about the overarching story, rather than wading through a "swamp of names, dates and events".


Unfortunately, this book turned out be a racist whitewashing of history through omission and minimization of slavery. Don't get me wrong, I don't claim to be a historian. However, even I was able to pick up on the flagrant minimization. Here's an example, the authors state that "Blacks had big families"... umm, you mean when they were forced to breed and rape of black women was common and unrecorded?

How about another example? The authors talk how in the summer slaves had 16 hour days with just one break in the afternoon just long enough to eat lunch. In the same breath, they say "as was common for white folks in that time as well". I'm pretty damn sure that slave's 16 work day was vastly different than a paid hand's day. No one is questioning whether whites worked hard or not. By equivocating the two, the authors reduce the barbarity of slavery.

A note to the authors:

Whether you know it or not, you're helping to propagate racist ideas. Please stop, especially since you're targeting this as supplemental teaching material. I challenge you to critically evaluate your ideas from an anti-racist lense.


4 people found this helpful

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Sanitized View of History

Although I believe the authors were trying to maintain a nonbiased view of the problems, I was appalled at the minimization of slavery. From everything I have read, I do not believe that most slaves were given meat regularly. They mention that slaves were able to supplement their meals from their own gardens. I am not sure when they had time when they worked such longer hours. Disappointing read.

4 people found this helpful

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If you’re a member of the Klu Klux Klan you will love it.

The Authors clearly had an agenda to re-write history. This book minimizes slavery and tries to promote the notion that enslaved people was actually better off. What garbage. It’s white supremacy doctrine disguised as “history”. These writers should be ashamed for promoting such trash. I am disappointed Audible would even make it available.

Lost Cause Garbage !

2 people found this helpful

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That's a deal breaker!

I was most of the way through chapter 1 when I hear, "You may wonder how people can treat each this cruelly, but you must remember that people in the 17th and 18th centuries did not value human life as much as we do today." Seriously? With the murder rate as high as it is and rising and the legal murder of hundreds of thousands of unborn babies, we value life more?!! That was a deal breaker for me. On to the next book!

2 people found this helpful

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ILLUMINATING

I have felt such sadness and heartbreak over what is happening in our country that I have been compelled to seek deeper understanding.

So, at 63 years of age I am looking for re-education in the beginnings of our country and how we have gotten to the point where we are today, so deeply divided and angry.

I searched Audible and was so glad to find this series, which I hope will shed more light on what I have forgotten or never learned.

I found the information in this recording VERY Enlightening and Easy to follow and the Narration very enjoyable to listen to. I have my notebook and pen ready for note-taking as I listen for a second time to help me better understand our History.

I also look forward to the other Titles contained in this Series! 🙏🏻💕




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5 🌟 stars!

very short, concise, and sweet! it's sad that the main stream education system spread such hate. i wish I had this book to read in junior high and high school.

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Good option for history on car rides

I'm a homeschooling mom of 2nd and 5th grade. History is a subject I enjoy as part of schooling of my elementary kids, but it usually gets pushed aside for the much more urgent tasks of reading and math. For their age, this was a pretty good way to "do history" in the car as we go about our days.

The narration and even content is somewhat dry (I wonder if more "interesting" narration would eliminate the seeming-dryness of the content.)

Some reviews have stated this is white washed and racist. I will say that I have not done extensive personal research on some of the specific points named in the reviews (accuracy of slaves being fed meat comes to mind). Those reviews made me hesitant to use this book for my purposes, but I decided to listen with an open mind and correct as we went along through discussion with the kids, as it did not seem there were other options that would cover this period in this narrative manner.

We are about 75% through the book and we have listened to the portions other reviews highlighted as problematic, mainly what the lives of slaves were like. The descriptions were sufficiently horrifying to my children that I do not think a book billed as a children's audio book should have anything more descriptive. My kids at 8 and 11 do not need to hear about the worst experiences the slaves had to endure to feel absolutely appalled that this was ever considered acceptable, nor have they been left with the impression that slaves lives were ok. What IS shared left them enraged and was graphic enough as it is.

The authors did not pull punches about the racism rampant in the hearts of white Americans, even those against slavery, so I was glad of that, as well as the opportunity to discuss the fact that even though there has been much progress since slavery was legal and expanding, racism and evil are still a problems today.

The rationale behind why southern slave owners kept slaves and how the slave trade came to the US may seem like apologizing, but I look at it more along the idea of wanting to know the motive and journey to a crime. We CAN just say the perpetrators were evil and committed evil, but that isn't very instructive.

There has been a lot of information about western expansion that I had either forgotten from my school days, or maybe just wasn't interesting to me as a student, that I am glad to be learning or re-learning. The authors also point out the importance of the publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin in turning Northern hearts and minds more strongly against slavery. I am adding it to my personal TBR stack.

The bottom line: This is a good option for homeschool use. It is not perfect, and it is definitely better for my 5th grader than my 2nd grader. I wish it was slightly more engaging to listen to, but it may be hard to make this awful topic and shameful history easy or enjoyable. I think the authors are well balanced given the intended audience. I will take good over perfect rather than nothing at all.

1 person found this helpful

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good facts

Narrator was easy to listen to. Serious voice for a serious subject. Glad it stuck to facts over socialism views.

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Great idea!

good way to learn the scenarios around a horrible time in our nation. hopefully it won't be repeated anytime soon.

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Great history lesson

The speaker is kinda dry, but the overall story is fantastic! Definitely worth a listen.

1 person found this helpful