1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Station Eternity  By  cover art

Station Eternity

By: Mur Lafferty
Narrated by: Sarah Mollo-Christensen
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $31.50

Buy for $31.50

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Amateur detective Mallory Viridian’s talent for solving murders ruined her life on Earth and drove her to live on an alien space station, but her problems still follow her in this witty, self-aware novel that puts a speculative spin on murder mysteries, from the Hugo-nominated author of Six Wakes.

From idyllic small towns to claustrophobic urban landscapes, Mallory Viridian is constantly embroiled in murder cases that only she has the insight to solve. But outside of a classic mystery novel, being surrounded by death doesn’t make you a charming amateur detective, it makes you a suspect and a social pariah. So when Mallory gets the opportunity to take refuge on a sentient space station, she thinks she has the solution. Surely the murders will stop if her only company is alien beings. At first her new existence is peacefully quiet…and markedly devoid of homicide.

But when the station agrees to allow additional human guests, Mallory knows the break from her peculiar reality is over. After the first Earth shuttle arrives, and aliens and humans alike begin to die, the station is thrown into peril. Stuck smack-dab in the middle of an extraterrestrial whodunit, and wondering how in the world this keeps happening to her anyway, Mallory has to solve the crime—and fast—or the list of victims could grow to include everyone on board….

©2022 Mur Lafferty (P)2022 Penguin Audio

Critic Reviews

“What a glorious romp. Murder, sentient space stations, and banter. It had everything I wanted.” (Mary Robinette Kowal, Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author of The Calculating Stars)

“A science fiction mystery has to nail both the science fiction and the mystery, and this book passes both tests with flying colors. As bingeable and satisfying as your favorite murder show. I couldn't put it down.” (Sarah Pinsker, Nebula Award-winning author of A Song For A New Day and We Are Satellites)

“Lafferty's characters stomp off the page, kicking ass and taking names as they do. If Jessica Fletcher ended up on Babylon Five, you still wouldn't get anywhere close to this deft, complicated, fast-moving book. Station Eternity kept me up way too late turning pages.” (T. Kingfisher, Hugo and Nebula Award-Winning author of Paladin's Grace and Nettle & Bone)

What listeners say about Station Eternity

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    38
  • 4 Stars
    17
  • 3 Stars
    15
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    41
  • 4 Stars
    15
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    32
  • 4 Stars
    17
  • 3 Stars
    13
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Hours of whining

The concept for this story is quite interesting and primarily told from the perspective of the main character. Could a person cause murders simply by being around others? The narration is poor, however, because that same main character is portrayed as a whining woman for hours on end, I doubt that is the way the author intended her to be portrayed. The narrator does not have a very good range of voices and most of the male voices sound very similar.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

This could have been amazing

If only the MC wasn't a weak willed, self loathing basket case who can't have a single conversation without whining. It's even more shocking that a woman author would write such a horrible female MC. If perpetuating how women need to seek validation from a man in order to feel good about themselves is what you are into, please listen. If you like female MCs who are strong in mind and character and can think for themselves, look elsewhere. You won't find a single character like that here. This could have been GREAT. Instead it's below mediocre.

The performance was okay. I didn't feel the voice went with the main character at all, but I think that's more of a me thing. The range if different voices was easily noticeable and well done.
Honestly, I would not waste a credit. I will be returning it if possible.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Sherlock in Space

A murder mysteries in space - aliens included. This book was fun, interesting and satisfying. There are lots of flashbacks. All of the characters are broken in some way. I look forward to book two.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Murder in space among aliens

Mur Lafferty's Station Eternity is a murder mystery set mainly on an alien space station. The main character, Mallory has a skill for solving murders which is convenient because they seem to always occur around her. She has managed to wrangle her way onto an alien space station to get away from Earth. There are only two other humans on the station, an Earth ambassador and another human receiving sanctuary. The whole background is related through a series of disjointed flashbacks that change the interpretation of subsequent actions. Humans seems unique among intelligent life as the only species without an accompanying symbiont. All hell breaks loose when a shuttle from Earth with many humans suffers an attack at the same time the station's AI symbiont is murdered.

While the premise is interesting, the frequent flashbacks hop around extensively with each vignette twisting the interpretation of previous flashbacks. There's some worn out cliches with the US military developing a weapon against all aliens. At the same time, the aliens are just bizarre with familial issues like any dysfunctional Earth family. The long setup to arrange the passenger manifest on the shuttle has the feel of a Hollywood murder mystery where the station is like a castle on a dark and stormy night.

The narration is well done, although the aliens don't seem alien relative to the humans. Pacing is uneven due to the frequent and sudden flashbacks.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Awesome concept, shaky execution

I absolutely love the idea behind this! And the world the author has built is fascinating—very cool to see the different species and the take on how it would be to be a human where nothing, from the food to the chairs to the toilets, is built with your species in mind. The author gave each character a backstory and personality, including several aliens. In several cases those characters were a bit caricatured or cliched, but I think that’s an inherent feature of the concept—if someone is somehow constantly finding themselves at the center of a classic murder mystery, then presumably they are also often surrounded by cliched characters.

That said, the lengthy flashbacks to the backstories were not very interesting, and they didn’t really affect the plot enough to be worth it. In fact, the protagonists didn’t really accomplish much either—this was much more a story of events witnessed and (for some) survived than a mystery or thriller where personal agency affected the outcome.

The writing was good throughout but the plot dragged and meandered quite a bit. As did the characters! There are long periods of running around urgently from point a to point b and back to point a, but not in a way that achieves much.

If you are looking for a nice exploration of human-alien and alien-alien relations, this is a great read! But if you are looking for a mystery novel in space (this may be my bad for misunderstanding the summary), this isn’t one really. The character with Jessica Fletcheritis doesn’t really follow through on the promise of that, and solving the mystery is not really central to events or the result of any effort or cleverness.