• Survival of the Richest

  • Escape Fantasies of the Tech Billionaires
  • By: Douglas Rushkoff
  • Narrated by: Douglas Rushkoff
  • Length: 6 hrs and 18 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (219 ratings)

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Survival of the Richest

By: Douglas Rushkoff
Narrated by: Douglas Rushkoff
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Publisher's Summary

In Survival of the Richest, Rushkoff traces the origins of The Mindset in science and technology through its current expression in missions to Mars, island bunkers, AI futurism, and the metaverse. In a dozen urgent, electrifying chapters, he confronts tech utopianism, the datafication of all human interaction, and the exploitation of that data by corporations. Through fascinating characters—master programmers who want to remake the world from scratch as if redesigning a video game and bankers who return from Burning Man convinced that incentivized capitalism is the solution to environmental disasters—Rushkoff explains why those with the most power to change our current trajectory have no interest in doing so. And he shows how recent forms of anti-mainstream rebellion—QAnon, for example, or meme stocks—reinforce the same destructive order. 

This mind-blowing work of social analysis shows us how to transcend the landscape The Mindset created—a world alive with algorithms and intelligences actively rewarding our most selfish tendencies—and rediscover community, mutual aid, and human interdependency. In a thundering conclusion, Survival of the Richest argues that the only way to survive the coming catastrophe is to ensure it doesn’t happen in the first place.

©2022 Douglas Rushkoff (P)2022 Recorded Books

What listeners say about Survival of the Richest

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Eye opening and insightful

Rushkoff presents us with an in-depth view of how the wealthiest people see the world and their place in it. He delves into the history of their scientific, binary and linear ways of thinking, and how they are eroding humanity as they do so. Realization of their damage has driven many of them to double down on their projects, with the aim of avoiding the consequences of their actions.

This was the first audio book I’ve listened to completely, and I plan to get his book and pepper it with sticky notes. The many things he discussed bear deep dives, and also present ideas for a future driven by regular people, not algorithms.

2 people found this helpful

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Billionaires Building Bonkers Bunkers

Rushkoff articulates how the billionaire "mindset" (and by extent the ethos of capitalism) is collapsing in onitself due to its sheer grandiosity. Terrified of the precarious state of our unsustanable way of life, Rushkoff documents how bilionaires seek to find an "exit strategy" and escape from the "event". This book reveals how the worlds most richest and powerful people justify this twisted logic of leaving "us" behind while "they" escape, and makes a strong case for why there is no escape. In short: "We neglect others at our own peril. Our own well-being is contingent on the well-being of others."

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better then l thought!!

l was a bit sectical of the book author, self proclaimed Marxist economists... but the preface was intriguing. The idea that the ultra rich were build personal luxury bolt holes was not surprising and l was actually hoping for more details on the subject. However, this turned into more of a tritus of the tech industry and the Mega rich and how they treat themselves as " separate from the unwashed mass". As a life long conservative, republican living in the largest red state in the continent , l was quite ready to dismiss this flaming blue state intellectual as another out of touch author and " humanist " who generally spent more time in the rarefied air of " techno geeks" and not amongst those of us that actually make the world turn...those now forgotten " essential workers " that were the hero's during this Covid crisis.....until we weren't. All that being said, l found the book compelling, informative as well as entertaining. It is worth the money to actually enter this " virtual world" of those of the super rich and powerful and actually see how vapid, self-centered and self-important these people are. But, they have always existed and probably always will. My political view won't be changing any time soon.... but, after this l will probably looking into the author other books. Please, enjoy.... it really is worth your time

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A Burning Criticism of Capitalism

Rushkoff leverages his insider knowledge to apply Marxist theory to current issues. If you're looking for a detailed list of all the reasons to regard those who lead and benefit from our growth dependent, broken system with contempt, you've found it (for better or worse).

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Everyone on the planet should read this book!

Captivating from the beginning very informative on the ways peoples minds operate rich verse poor mentality that had burdened our society for way to long. We are interconnected!

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Wild ride

Eye opening and informative. Could be thought of as fiction but sadly it’s real, which is scary. I enjoyed this read and it gave me much to think about. I went in thinking that rich people had all the answers and the book has convinced me that they seem to have less answers.

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Interesting point of view but oversimplifies tech and growth

A friend recommended this audiobook to me. I liked some of the insights into the kooky plans of billionaires and his critique of the “mindset” as the author dubs the thinking behind todays growth at any costs mentality.

However, where the author lost me is on his misunderstanding of ideas like those found in the “The Selfish Gene” and his efforts to tar Dawkins as some sort of amoral atheist for being associated with Jeffrey Epstein. This is an old trick and a nasty one. Discredit by association the people with whose ideas you disagree. I’m sure the author is in a ton of pictures with some unsavory people. What should we make of his ideas then?

And speaking of his ideas, early on in the book I got the feeling the author has a Marxist ideology that he was hell bent on proving to us is the right way and it seemed he was cherry picking stories, over simplifying motives, throwing around studies without footnotes, and ignoring one of the main tenants of human nature: the benefit of competition on a human scale to bring success to the species as a whole.

Listen, the author is right about some of the horrible business practices, unfair taxation, and harmful ways we treat our environment. But his “mindset”, let’s call it “new age marxism” ignores the benefits of capitalism and its ability to lift millions of people out of poverty.

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Insightful and thought provoking

The book reinforces some of my preexisting beliefs about the mindsets of the ultra rich and provides insight into other motivations that may be driving the ultra rich towards self annihilation for themselves and self-extinction for Humanity. The only thing I wish the author provided more of were solutions like that book called "Solutions: Enough Complaining. Let's Fix America" because by now most people have been told what's wrong by every news source but few offer solutions

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Brilliant!

A fantastic read. Survival of the Richest joins a host of my favorites on the shelf. He’s now up there with Haidt if not towering over him on the subject — because the root cause… the real problem… is the tech bros and their unchallenged greed! They are the threat! Torches and pitchforks are needed now more than ever.

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  • dk
  • 11-30-22

Painful

Just painful. Should have been a magazine article at most. Basically it was a long rambling rant.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 09-14-22

a good start...

the beginning is origional but on the whole its feàr mongering and a pleà to consume less.

while i do not disagree with the conclusion there were a lot of minor points i disagreed witth. so if youre looking for something to challenge your world view you should buy it BUT my first paragraph sums up this book pretty wel and imo its not worth it