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Technical Traders and Commodity Speculators  By  cover art

Technical Traders and Commodity Speculators

By: Lyn M. Sennholz,Bruce Babcock
Narrated by: Louis Rukeyser
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Publisher's Summary

Most investors do not get involved in speculation or commodities, but speculators play a vital function in financial markets by absorbing and managing risk. Technical traders practically ignore business results within specific companies, instead focusing on broad market indicators such as price trends, trading volume, and rate of change in major stock-market averages.

The Secrets of the Great Investors series is a collection of presentations that explain, in understandable language, the strategies, tactics, and principles that have produced great wealth, and how you can improve your financial future. History's greatest investors used powerful investing philosophies to produce superior results, and you can learn from their successes and mistakes.

Liked this listen? Download the rest of The Secrets of the Great Investors series.
©1997 Carmichael and Carmichael, Inc. and Knowledge Products (P)1997 Carmichael and Carmichael, Inc. and Knowledge Products

What listeners say about Technical Traders and Commodity Speculators

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    112
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Story
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  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Hopelessly outdated

The only redeeming feature of this work is to somehow believe that once traders had to draw their own charts by hand, and could not even think of the possibility of executing a trade within a second.

Wow, how did anyone do it?

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars

Out of date and not worth the time.

The information is so outdated and so many things are related to not having computers that it is not worth your time.

6 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • DS
  • 03-19-13

WORTH A SECOND LISTEN

I've been a stock trader for a number of years and I found a lot of basic truths, that even experienced traders, should be reminded of from time to time. At about an hour in length, this is a very efficient way to remind oneself.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Enjoyable education.

Great historical information. Going over many of the developmental ideas in trading stocks, options and into futures. Excellent.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

I’m impressed

For it coming as part of the audible listen I’ve come to greatly respect this saga of books and stories. Specially this one being more of the kinda market practitioner I am.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

outdated but useful in learning from history

It is a great history on commodity trading and technical trading. This is during the time a lot of things were illegal. So outdated but quite interesting if you're interested in learning from history. I like the idea of trend following with proper risk management in commodities.
1. trade with a trend.
2 cut losses short.
3. let profits run.
4. manage risk.

the defense (how much you are willing to lose) first before offense (how much you wanna gain) strategy is consistent in great traders in this audio.
It is fascinating how history shows that greed can make people lose a lot of money when the risk is not managed well.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Very valuable!

A must hear - more than once! - whether one deals in commodity futures or not.

The realistic assumption of earning 'only' 20-30% p.a. on one's capital and having to expect more losing trades than winning trades overall, may discourage novices. This might be a good thing.

Options are not quite as bad as indicated by several authors. Naturally, option writers have advantages over option buyers as ~75% of options expire worthless. However, these two strategies are rather different. I recommend looking at this rather underrated book by Kevin Kerr: A Maniac Commodity Trader's Guide To Making A Fortune: A Not-So-Crazy Roadmap to Riches.

It would be wonderful if Kevin Kerr's book were available not only as CD, but also as an Audible version. I own a hard copy.

Both publications added to my skills and I substantially improved my trading.

The reason why I gave this audio's performance only 4 stars: Too much time is wasted in between the various 'chapters'.


  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

fun piece of history

It's a history lesson. Not an how to trade book as some seem to think in the reviews.
They are great short story's from traders in the old days.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

If you have time and are wise

I believe knowing story makes you better at everything you do. This is merely a book to understand where we come from and the market.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Very good as an ultra short presentation.

Read Jack Schwager for more on the same, he just doesn't go into the beginnings.