• The Aftermath of Battle

  • The Burial of the Civil War Dead (Emerging Civil War Series)
  • By: Meg Groeling
  • Narrated by: Joshua Saxon
  • Length: 5 hrs and 13 mins
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (8 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

The clash of armies in the American Civil War left hundreds of thousands of men dead, wounded, or permanently damaged. Skirmishes and battles could result in casualty numbers as low as one or two and as high as 10s of thousands. The carnage of the battlefield left a lasting impression on those who experienced or viewed it, but in most cases the armies quickly moved on to meet again at another time and place. When the dust settled and the living armies moved on, what happened to the dead left behind?

Unlike battle narratives, The Aftermath of Battle: The Burial of the Civil War Dead picks up the story as the battle ends.

The burial of the dead was an overwhelming experience for the armies or communities forced to clean up after the destruction of battle. In the short-term action, bodies were hastily buried to avoid the stench and the horrific health concerns of massive death; in the long-term, families struggled to reclaim loved ones and properly reenter them in established cemeteries.

Visitors to a battlefield often wonder what happened to the dead once the battle was over. In this easy-to-listen overview that will complement any Civil War library, author Meg Groeling provides a look at the aftermath of battle and the process of burying the Civil War dead.

The Aftermath of Battle is part of the Emerging Civil War Series offering compelling, easy-to-listen overviews of some of the Civil War’s most important stories.

©2015 Savas Beatie (P)2019 Savas Beatie

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Thought Provoking

The Aftermath of Battle. This is a thought provoking book. One of the most informative works of modern times. There are many facts and descriptions of the Battlefields in the days following the engagements .
The civil war was a tragedy that caused untold suffering but ultimately forged the nation.
The narration is excellent, clear and concise which is needed in a history.
I received a free copy of this audio book at my own request and voluntarily leave this review.

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Morbid, yet fascinating

The subject of the Civil War dead isn't one most want to study in full detail for obvious reasons. It can be gruesome and heart wrenching. However, it's a completely necessary aspect of Civil War studies. It's easy to see the casualty numbers and move on, but behind every number is a name, a family, sometimes a gravestone. Groeling perfectly explains the evolution of "dead detail" from its messy and disorganized beginnings to its methodical and groundbreaking conclusion while providing engaging narratives at the beginning of the chapters to set the tone for the presenting topic. I enjoyed it all (as morbid as that sounds), as well as the Appendices at the end to accompany the text. It's an informative piece of work that shouldn't be overlooked by any Civil War historian.

1 person found this helpful