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Publisher's Summary

"A provocative history" of intrigue and class struggle in ancient Rome - "an important alternative to the usual views of Caesar and the Roman Empire" (Publishers Weekly).

Most historians, both ancient and modern, have viewed the Late Republic of Rome through the eyes of its rich nobility - the one percent of the population who controlled 99 percent of the empire's wealth. In The Assassination of Julius Caesar, Michael Parenti recounts this period, spanning the years 100 to 33 BC, from the perspective of the Roman people. In doing so, he presents a provocative, trenchantly researched narrative of popular resistance against a powerful elite.

As Parenti carefully weighs the evidence concerning the murder of Caesar, he adds essential context to the crime with fascinating details about Roman society as a whole. In this book, we find reflections on the democratic struggle waged by Roman commoners, religious augury as an instrument of social control, the patriarchal oppression of women, and the political use of homophobic attacks. The Assassination of Julius Caesar offers a whole new perspective on an era thought to be well-known.

©2003 Michael Parenti (P)2022 Tantor
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

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another side to Roman history

I never thought I would see the day where Michael parenti of all people would have one of his books get the audible treatment. it's good that he is getting the exposure that that he deserves he's been writing from an anti-capitalist lens for his entire adult life. This is definitely an essential book if you want to get a Marxist analysis on Roman history. typically the history of Rome is written from the respective of the rulers and not the people of Rome and this gives a different perspective on Roman history which is never really written from the perspective of the people.

This black shirts and reds and history is mystery are Michael parenti greatest works which is highly recommended.

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Michael Parenti is one of America's greatest

Michael Parenti is one of America's greatest living thinkers and historians. He does so even against sanctioning popular narratives; not as a contrarian, but as an incorruptible mind.

I've always hated the depiction of the mob knowing that I was the mob. The language is deprecating and elitist. Earlier depictions of the mob for me were experienced when talking about the French Revolution and American History. Take the French Revolution; it's commonly taught as if French Society was doing fine until the mob went crazy and started cutting everyone's heads off. There's obviously something missing. There's obviously something willfully left unspoken. Kings are not the way Disney would have you view them. They're an evil sort of thing. The horrors of Monarchy are left unexpressed. This is done so willfully that most people having graduated high school and studied it, couldn't tell you what Feudalism is. We don't understand the fundamental differences between Social Orders. An infantilized narrative is reproduced so that people think all of History is capitalist.

This book seeks to break that. Rome was a Slave Society. The Senators were Slavers. Rome wasn't a free Republic with a few slaves here and there. It was a Slave Society, yet nobody understands that part of history. It isn't told, and it's willfully untold. Why did Rome welcome Caesar as a Liberator? It's because he was a Liberator. Why did Rome scorn his assassins? It's because they were Slavers.