• The Bataan Death March

  • Life and Death in the Philippines During World War II
  • By: Charles River Editors
  • Narrated by: Colin Fluxman
  • Length: 1 hr and 21 mins
  • 4.3 out of 5 stars (16 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
The Bataan Death March  By  cover art

The Bataan Death March

By: Charles River Editors
Narrated by: Colin Fluxman
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $6.95

Buy for $6.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

"They went down by twos and threes. Usually, they made an effort to rise. I never can forget their groans and strangled breathing as they tried to get up. Some succeeded. Others lay lifelessly where they had fallen...I observed that the Jap guards paid no attention to these. I wondered why. The explanation wasn't long in coming. There was a sharp crackle of pistol and rifle fire behind us." (Captain William Dyess)

On December 7, 1941, the Japanese military engaged in a preemptive strike against the American Pacific fleet stationed at Pearl Harbor, but they also began maneuvers to attack the American controlled Philippines. Although General Douglas A. MacArthur and Allied forces tried to hold out, they could only fight a delaying action, and the Japanese managed to subdue all resistance by the spring of 1942. However, in the aftermath of Japan's successful invasion, as the nation's military strategists began preparations for the next phase of military actions in the theater, their forces had to deal with a critical logistical problem they had not foreseen. The Japanese had to deal with large numbers of Filipino and American soldiers who had surrendered after a lengthy defense in the Bataan peninsula, but they were not prepared for so many prisoners of war because their own military philosophy emphasized rigid discipline and fighting until the end. They could not imagine a situation in which Japanese soldiers would willingly surrender, so they assumed that no other combatants would do so either.

©2012 Charles River Editors (P)2016 Charles River Editors
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

What listeners say about The Bataan Death March

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    10
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    7
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    7
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Short, but excellent!!

The Bataan Death March was one of the most infamous acts committed by the Japanese Imperial Army during the Second World War.
Only the Rape of the city of Nanking, could rival the magnitude of human atrocities and inhumanity that the Japanese Imperial Army committed on a group of people.
It galvanized resistance against the Japanese invasion and was a very convincing proof that the Japanese Coprosperity Sphere, was a farce and a lie.
The Japanese were not saviors and liberators, they were monsters and worse than the plague itself.
The Bataan Death March showed the world, the barbarity, cruelty and inhumanity of the Japanese Imperial overlords.
This tragic event became one of the most effective recruiting posters to motivate resistance against Japanese Imperial rule.
It clearly showed who were the GOOD guys and the BAD guys.
This short, almost pamphlet like explanation of the event hits the mark in explaining how the event unfolded.
Excellent narration.
Highly Recommended.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

No good

Why would you let an English accent man read a story about the Japanese, Vietnamese and Americans. I could not even think about what he was saying. his voice is so out of context.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for slipperychimp
  • slipperychimp
  • 09-23-19

A little gem

The book is a collection of personal accounts from American POW's recalling their time both during and after the Bataan Death March. Clearly a labour of love, I found it to be an engaging and worthwhile listen.

As a Brit - most of my WWII interest focuses on the European Campaigns and I didn't know anything about this horrible atrocity beforehand. My lack of knowledge of the Pacific Theatre didn't hinder my appreciation of the book however, the author briefly frames the context and the factors that helped me understand the testimonials that followed, the work is also well concluded.

The Narration is clear, well paced and engaging, this book has peaked my interest in the Pacific Theatre and I'm sure I'll look in to this further.

Recommended for those who (like me) know nothing about this march, or for those looking to deepen their understanding from a more human and personal perspective.