• The Birth of Modern Politics

  • Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and the Election of 1828
  • By: Lynn Hudson Parson
  • Narrated by: Milton Bagby
  • Length: 10 hrs and 9 mins
  • 4.1 out of 5 stars (84 ratings)

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The Birth of Modern Politics

By: Lynn Hudson Parson
Narrated by: Milton Bagby
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Publisher's Summary

The 1828 presidential election, which pitted Major General Andrew Jackson against incumbent John Quincy Adams, has long been hailed as a watershed moment in American political history. It was the contest in which an unlettered, hot-tempered southwestern frontiersman, trumpeted by his supporters as a genuine man of the people, soundly defeated a New England "aristocrat" whose education and political resume were as impressive as any ever seen in American public life. It was, many historians have argued, the country's first truly democratic presidential election.

Lynn Hudson Parsons argues that it also established a pattern in which two nationally organized political parties would vie for power in virtually every state. During the election of 1828 voters were introduced to a host of novel campaign tactics, including coordinated media, get-out-the-vote efforts, fund-raising, organized rallies, opinion polling, campaign paraphernalia, ethnic voting blocs, "opposition research," and smear tactics.

In The Birth of Modern Politics, Parsons shows that the Adams-Jackson contest began a national debate that is eerily contemporary, pitting those whose cultural, social, and economic values were rooted in community action for the common good against those who believed the common good was best served by giving individuals as much freedom as possible to promote their own interests. It offers fresh and illuminating portraits of both Adams and Jackson and reveals how, despite their vastly different backgrounds, they had started out with many of the same values, admired one another, and had often been allies in common causes. Both were staunch nationalists, and both shared an aversion to organized parties and "electioneering."But by 1828, caught up in a shifting political landscape, they were plunged into a competition that separated them decisively from the Founding Fathers' era and ushered in a style of politics that is still with us today.

The “Pivotal Moments in American History” series seeks to unite the old and the new history, combining the insights and techniques of recent historiography with the power of traditional narrative. Each title has a strong narrative arc with drama, irony, suspense, and – most importantly – great characters who embody the human dimension of historical events. The general editors of “Pivotal Moments” are not just historians; they are popular writers themselves, and, in two cases, Pulitzer Prize winners: David Hackett Fischer, James M. McPherson, and David Greenberg. We hope you like your American History served up with verve, wit, and an eye for the telling detail!

©2009 Lynn Parsons (P)2009 Audible, Inc.
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

What listeners say about The Birth of Modern Politics

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

a very good popular history book

This book is a perfect, short, well-read, light history of the first quarter of the 19th century in America, with a particular focus on the period 1820-1828, and the rivalries among John Quincy Adams (a highly educated scion of the Adams family), Andrew Jackson (a "wild & crazy" guy of his day) and such secondary characters as William Crawford, John Calhoun, Martin Van Buren. Colorful characters, a colorful period too. If you like popular US history, you will most assuredly like this.

The narration is very good.

9 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Great Find

This book encapsulates a point in time where things changed concerning elections in America. The author does a great job of setting this book up, so the reader gets the benefit of learning a lot about Early America after the war of 1812. Good stuff, go for it.

3 people found this helpful

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A good history of a watershed election

A good history of a watershed election. Focuses on the battle between John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson but also lays a good foundation for the origins of their loathing of each other.

1 person found this helpful

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Great Book

Great book. Historically accurate but also entertaining and easy to listen to. It really shows how what happened almost 200 years ago is relevant today.

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Learning

For someone who wants to understand politics this book was a good source of information and nuanced