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The Camelot Caper  By  cover art

The Camelot Caper

By: Elizabeth Peters
Narrated by: Grace Conlin
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Publisher's Summary

Jessica Tregarth goes to England to visit her grandfather; an invitation that surprises and pleases her. The only link she has with her dead father's family is an antique ring he brought with him to America. This will be a chance to learn more about who she is; it will be fun.

She's barely off the boat before the chase begins and Jess finds herself playing a deadly game of cat-and-mouse through Cornwall, helped by David Randall, the ingenious author of a series of paperback gothic novels. But even Randall's cleverness may not be enough: the couple doesn't know what the pursuers want...and it is not the obvious.

©1969 Elizabeth Peters (P)1995 Blackstone Audiobooks

What listeners say about The Camelot Caper

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Not Amelia. . . .

Having listened to all the Amelia Peabody mysteries (or at least the ones with a tolerable narrator), I turned to this book to get my Elizabeth Peters fix. The narration was pleasant, but the plot and characters left me unsatisfied. The heroine was such an idiot and her male savior came up with all the good ideas. I cared for her so little that I almost hoped that she wouldn't survive her delimas! I did suffer through the whole book, so I suppose it must have been decent, but I warn you not to expect very much if you buy this book.

14 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Bring your sense of humor!

It seems as though Ms Peters put her tongue firmly in cheek before she started writing this book, and I certainly found myself giggling in many places! This is an early book by this author, and doesn't have the character and plot development that I've seen in her later works. It is still a lot of fun!

13 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

They're out to get you but you don't call police?!

Would you try another book from Elizabeth Peters and/or Grace Conlin?

Elizabeth Peters, yes. Read/love all of her Amelia Peabody series. Her books under "Barbara Michaels" are a mixed bag. I don't like Grace Conlin's reading. I thought she read this book better than two others - Summer of the Dragon & The Night of 400 Rabbits. I would have given NO stars for her performance of these two if I hadn't feared this would be misunderstood as an omission rather than an evaluation.

If you’ve listened to books by Elizabeth Peters before, how does this one compare?

Not in the ballpark with Amelia Peabody series. Better than Night of 400 Rabbits. About as good as Summer of the Dragon. Not as good as The Dead Sea Cipher (which reminds me more of Amelia.)

Would you be willing to try another one of Grace Conlin’s performances?

Since Elizabeth Peters won't be writing any more books, I might have to but I really would prefer another reader, especially Barbara Rosenblat.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

Yes.

Any additional comments?

The only policeman in all of England seems to be the one who was on the train platform when Jessica's suitcase is almost stolen. The man who was carrying it off returned it - claiming a mistake - so where was HIS suitcase he mistook it for?!! Credulous police officer.
After that Jess's room is obviously searched (I'd have called the front desk & asked for the police), a man comes at her in a church, she escapes town on a bus and a busload of people cover for her when her pursuers block the road and come aboard looking for her, she and a companion are kidnapped, her companion is drugged, his car has its motor stolen and on and on, and none of this is EVER reported to the police. Jess & David just go on taking risks and playing games and ultimately walking into the lion's den. Twice. I would have documented & reported every single incident. Do-it-yourself crime solving is clearly not my cup of tea when there's an authority figure to whom to appeal. So I found my suspended disbelief stretched too far on this one.
Also, Jess annoyed me at times with her focus on being a tourist - I don't care how gorgeous the cathedral is when somebody armed is following me.
On the positive side, I liked David very much and loved how he thought Jess was put up to hoaxing him because of his profession, and I loved his profession. I liked some of Jess's dialog. "Who took my clothes off?" IS a lot more original than, "Where am I?" I loved the wonderful people on the bus. Reminded me of a scene in an Alfred Hitchcock movie - think it was Torn Curtain - where the bus is a fake & smuggling the good guys out of the danger area. I hated Cousin John and Algernon (Freddie). I was surprised at the mechanism for Jess & David's escaping their prison - I actually thought Guinevere was Freddie in drag.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

A bit of fun fluff

A bit of fun fluff. An enjoyable listen while doing some gardening or some such endeavor.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Light and Fun

I agree with the first reviewers, this is not Amelia's eighteen-hundreds. This is the nineteen- sixties, and I can see the young Goldie Hawn bouncing from small museums to famous Cathedrals across the English countryside trying to avoid (or is it find) the mysterious Cousin John. All of the characters with the possible exception of the bad guy, (who is not Cousin John), are having a really good time. What's a broken nose, and rifled luggage when there are beautiful ancient buildings to see.

But this is still Elizabeth Peters, and although this is an early work, and it is a comic farce, she is serious about her history. While the Arthur stories are more legend than fact, there are enough late Roman and early Anglo-Saxon artifacts to hang this story on. Evidently people can be as obsessed with having King Arthur as an ancestor as Ramses the Great.

The best part of this book is finding out why Sir John Smythe becomes the man who will drive Vicki Bliss mad when she meets him in the Street of the Five Moons.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

For a freebie, it’s OK

I suspect this was a freebie because it is an early book for Peters and not impressive (though I’m not a big fan of her later books, either). The plot is “meh” and the characters even more so. There are so many stupid choices they make. I was trying to find biographical information about the narrator, because she wasn’t bad, but her unusual pronunciation of certain words had me wondering if it is because she doesn’t know the correct pronunciation, or does she come from some place where that is an accepted pronunciation. The book wasn’t so bad that I didn’t bother to listen to the end. I did enjoy the fact that they visited a bunch of places in England that I had visited, but there wasn’t too much depth in any of it.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

not bad, but dated

I probably loved this book when it was written in 1969 and I was 17, but it seems trite now.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Quirky fun for the genre and for being written in

Its the colorful characters that sell it. Such as when Jessica is on a bus, going somewhere in order to get away from her pursuers. The English villagers rally 'round to help her out, even connecting her with a nephew who can drive her back to London (and become the eventual love interest.)

This is very loosely tied to the Vicky Bliss series, as Cousin John is who becomes John "Smythe."

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

lighthearted, silly fun

I love Elizabeth Peters. this does not measure up to the Amelia Peabody series by any means, but is a fun read.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Implausible but Fun

Jessica makes her first visit to England to meet her estranged grandfather, but finds herself involved in a dangerous mystery. This story is light, implausible, and not as well-written as Peters' later novels, yet it's easy to ignore the absurd and just enjoy the adventure.

Ms. Conlin's narration was average, but there were times when her Englishmen sounded the same and I had a difficult time distinguishing who was speaking.