• The Clutter Corpse

  • By: Simon Brett
  • Narrated by: Simon Brett
  • Length: 6 hrs and 50 mins
  • 4.2 out of 5 stars (72 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Ellen Curtis runs her own business helping people who are running out of space. As a declutterer, she is used to encountering all sorts of weird and wonderful objects in the course of her work. What she has never before encountered is a dead body. 

When Ellen stumbles across the body of a young woman in an over-cluttered flat, suspicion immediately falls on the deceased homeowner's son, who has recently absconded from prison. No doubt Nate Ogden is guilty of many things - but is he really the killer? Discovering a link between the victim and her own past, Ellen sets out to uncover the truth. But where has her best friend disappeared to? And is Ellen really prepared for the shocking revelations to follow?

©2020 Simon Brett (P)2020 Dreamscape Media, LLC

What listeners say about The Clutter Corpse

Average Customer Ratings
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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

New Simon Brett

Good story, a bit dark. Sympathetic slightly
flawed characters, good insight into mental illness and the struggles of supportive family members.

7 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Nicely interweaves many types of mental illness

I thought this would be a light-hearted story about clutter that I’d listen to while tidying up the house. Turns out I was wrong. The book explored the normalcy of mental illness and how it shows up in different ways. I listened to the entire book in a single day.

6 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Great story-Excellent narration!

I have been a reader of Mr Brett’s books for some time, but only recently heard him read-My first listen was a Blotto and Twinks-it was a fun listen and Mr Brett does marvelous voices for the characters. Can’t wait to hear another-Thank You Mr Brett!

6 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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5 Stars

The Clutter Corpse is an entertaining cozy mystery. I like the characters and the plot. I wish there was more said after Ellen realized her best friend's betrayal, but I guess that would have been a different kind of book. I look forward to the next one in this series.

4 people found this helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars

The Clutter Corpse

In this story Simon Brett has explored several psychological ailments, including being an enabler. I do read self-help books, but when I settle down with a whodunit I expect a vacation from angst. This book didn't hit the mark for me.

2 people found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

The Humor is Gone

I was confused that this new main character is not full of wit, or much fun at all. Everything is pretty serious. Drug addicts, sociopaths, suicidal depressives, rich and annoying folks. It was interesting for a while, some decent social insight actually. But it is just too unrelenting, and there is no real relief. This is too far from Charles Parris. For a novelist with a million years of experience, it isn't put together all that well. A lot of stuff happens at the end, and a lot of stuff doesn't really make sense. It's a little cluttered, which is ironic. Things just seem so bleak in Britain, like the drama Unforgotten. Misery is layered and layered, and it's not clear why we need to see this as a form of art or expression. It really was only worth two stars, but it was promising for about half the book.

2 people found this helpful

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Great start to a new series.

I really liked the situation/setup of the book and the main character, Ellen. I disliked Ellen's mother but actually became irritated that Ellen was prepared to tolerate her mother's constant put-downs. I felt this had led to the equally judgmental, disrespectful attitude of Ellen's daughter. I did begin to wonder what possible function in the series they served, except to show Ellen as a weak, emotionally downtrodden person when she is in their presence.

2 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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My Love/Hate relationship with this series

This is really a review of this series, of which there are (so far) only two books.

On the whole, I like much of Simon Brett’s work - I even love the books most people don’t enjoy as much (like the Mrs Pargeter series). No one can fault Mr. Brett’s writing, his reading is superb, and he plots well, too. I love his main characters and Ellen - the protagonist in this series - is perhaps one of my favorites so far. As the parent of an adult child with “issues” I think Brett is decent at portraying what it’s like to be a parent of a child like that (though he doesn’t really capture the frustration, he does get the fear spot-on).

Spoiler:

What bothered me after reading the two books in this series was realizing that so much of the plot ended up revolving around women with overwhelming jealousy. Seriously??? One book I can accept - but both??? And BOTH were women “of a certain age”. Sigh. As one of those aforementioned women I found this to be rather annoying - like when you notice that 90% of the murderers on Midsomer Murders are just actually Loony Tunes. Surely writers who have managed so well so far can manage a bit further?

Mr. Brett, you can Do Better.

Now, excuse me while I go sharpen my knives.

1 person found this helpful

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Review

it kept me wondering till the end who the killer was their motive. Insightful descriptions of depression and its effects on family and friends.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Problem Solver or Enabler

I enjoyed the author’s narration but am not sure what the point of the book is. It’s not a happy book, with too many people having too many problems. The main character, Ellen, is supposed to help people with hoarding issues but she often seems to be an enabler in many cases which doesn’t help anyone change their circumstances. I find that take on things pretty odd.