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Publisher's Summary

The Color of Compromise takes listeners on a historical journey: from America's early colonial days through slavery and the Civil War, covering the tragedy of Jim Crow laws and the victories of the Civil Rights era, to today's Black Lives Matter movement. Author Jemar Tisby reveals the obvious - and the far more subtle - ways the American church has compromised what the Bible teaches about human dignity and equality.

Tisby uncovers the roots of sustained injustice in the American church, highlighting the cultural and institutional tables that need to be turned in order to bring about real and lasting progress between Black and White people. Through a story-driven survey of American Christianity's racial past, he exposes the concrete and chilling ways people of faith have actively worked against racial justice, as well as the deafening silence of the white evangelical majority. Tisby shows that while there has been progress in fighting racism, historically the majority of the American church has failed to speak out against this evil. This ongoing complicity is a stain upon the church, and sadly, it continues today.

Tisby does more than diagnose the problem, however. He charts a path forward with intriguing ideas that further the conversation as he challenges us to reverse these patterns and systems of complicity with bold, courageous, and immediate action. The Color of Compromise provides an accurate diagnosis for a racially divided American church and suggests creative ways to foster a more equitable and inclusive environment among God's people.

©2019 Jemar Tisby (P)2019 Zondervan

What listeners say about The Color of Compromise

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Profile Image for BruthazKeepah
  • BruthazKeepah
  • 05-17-19

Heartbreakingly real + helpful “read”

I’m listening to this on Audible. It’s heartbreaking, so going slow. Tackles lots of things in the Christian church’s history that we have often yet to acknowledge, never mind truly grapple with.
Somebody needs to write this book for the South African church (my home nation, which shares a similar history, with Christianity providing the theological backing for a lot of apartheid state’s dehumanising action and treatment of Black image bearers). I’ll have to, if nobody else does.
Oh, and the Brit church too!

Much of these facts alone are well known. But seeing all (selectively, yes!) string together highlights the complicity. Makes me think of Frederick Douglas’ words (nothing new; just all heartbreakingly brought together in a helpful way).

Thanks Jemar!

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Profile Image for Joshua
  • Joshua
  • 02-13-19

History with an unnecessary addition

I picked this book up as a passing interest in its premise. Not being an American and only seeing things in movies to do with their history I thought it might be a good read, from a Christian viewpoint. I think the easiest way to say why I only gave it 2 stars is from a pro/con list.

Pro's:
The history was interesting and there were moments where I felt sick or wanted to cry.
Learning the history of complicity in racism in the church, especially looking at it on the view of the church modeling culture rather than Jesus, is a sobering reminder of the dangers of getting close to the world and what can happen because of that.

Con's:
This may be my mistake, but I thought this was supposed to be from a Christian perspective. While many statements are made (expecting us to believe it is truth according to the bible) no justification or passages are ever given. From memory, there was only one bible passage used and it was at the end, in regards to someone else and their initiative.

The writer seems to have rose coloured glasses on. To clarify, there are a few times where the author refers to the slaves homeland and almost waxes lyrical about it. Including, in a way, promoting their pagan beliefs. Again, may be my mistake in believing it was from a Christian perspective. This issue is also seen in the authors take on Martin Luther King Jr though. It is kind of portrayed that MLK was perfect (maybe not that far, but making the point). Overall, this adds a bias to the book, that while hard to avoid when telling history, does ruin it a little.

The history part was interesting. The author should have stopped there, unfortunately the author then goes on to make it a political piece, specifically against the republican party, which I found weird. I can understand what he is saying in regards to the republican party, but find it weird that they are solely focused on. Maybe this one is just an American thing though?

There are other issues I have with it as well, but I feel this is getting a bit long and don't want to be too negative.

I do think the book is worth a read, I just wouldn't hold too much stock in it.

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