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Publisher's Summary

From the $700 billion bailout of the banking industry to president Barack Obama's $787 billion stimulus package to the highly controversial passage of federal health-care reform, conservatives and concerned citizens alike have grown increasingly fearful of big government.  

The Constitution of Liberty is considered Hayek's classic statement on the ideals of freedom and liberty, ideals that he believes have guided - and must continue to guide - the growth of Western civilization. Here, Hayek defends the principles of a free society, casting a skeptical eye on the growth of the welfare state and examining the challenges to freedom posed by an ever-expanding government - as well as its corrosive effect on the creation, preservation, and utilization of knowledge. In opposition to those who call for the state to play a greater role in society, Hayek puts forward a nuanced argument for prudence. Guided by this quality, he elegantly demonstrates that a free market system in a democratic polity - under the rule of law and with strong constitutional protections of individual rights - represents the best chance for the continuing existence of liberty.

©1960, 2011 the University of Chicago (P)2019 Tantor

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very detailed and important

It's full of details and you might have to break up listening to it in chunks. An absolutely important work though and I'm glad I committed to finishing it.

2 people found this helpful

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Great commentary on Liberty and Common Sense.

I have enjoyed Professor Hayak's approach to Common Sense.

and this collection of essays provides a wide ranging opportunity to look around today and realize how eloquent he was in his discussion of society and social changes.

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Pushes socialism

Talks about how liberty isn’t really freedom. Same ideology to that of Karl Marx.

‘To be free is simple; to have the ability to act on your own behalf and maintain accountability regardless of the outcome’

This author Does not believe in that. If you believe in Frederic Bastiat then don’t waste your time here.

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Good Content, but Boring Writing

As usual, Hayek is an excellent thinker who has good and important ideas. But, my goodness, his writing style is painfully boring. I almost have up reading. And I'm the kind of guy that likes reading economics and political philosophy.

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great book, good voice reading it.

great book, good voice reading the book. only thing I would change is more inflection in the voice. During long sessions it got monotone.