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Publisher's Summary

Elizabeth Jones, vacationing from her New York publishing job, is off to do touristy things in Denmark: gawk at the Little Mermaid, stroll in the Tivoli...look for a missing person? The plane ride itself had turned out to be Kismet, introducing Elizabeth to her idol, Nobel Prize-winning historian and famed eccentric Margaret Rosenberg and her long-suffering son, Christian. So when Margaret vanishes in Copenhagen, Elizabeth joins the irascible Christian in searching the city, from underground crypts to the graves of queens. What they encounter is a baffling ransom demand for a bathrobe, not money. And what they dig up will connect a modern disappearance with an ancient artifact and the oldest of motives for crime.

The Copenhagen Connection is an Elizabeth Peters classic, featuring her signature blend of ancient history and modern mayhem, red herrings, and the crème de la crème of amateur detectives.

©1982 Elizabeth Peters (P)1995 Blackstone Audio Inc.

Critic Reviews

"This is an entertaining tale, full of charm." (Library Journal)

What listeners say about The Copenhagen Connection

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    132
  • 4 Stars
    95
  • 3 Stars
    51
  • 2 Stars
    20
  • 1 Stars
    6
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    140
  • 4 Stars
    84
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    34
  • 2 Stars
    7
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    2
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    110
  • 4 Stars
    87
  • 3 Stars
    46
  • 2 Stars
    17
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    6

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

You see where (romance) is going, enjoy the ride

From the time Elizabeth Jones and Christian Rosenberg (his eccentric sister's keeper) meet on the plane, sparks fly and you see where it's (their romance) is going but enjoy the ride. On her dream trip to Copenhagen, Elizabeth recognizes her idol, a famous author, Margaret Rosenberg, a Nobel Prize in Literature winner. Seeking closer inspection she manages to spill the contents of his coffee cup all over Margaret's seatmate's lap. The man is Christian, her brother, who keeps brilliant but wacky Margaret in line. When Margaret's secretary is injured at the airport in a luggage accident, Elizabeth is thrust into that role to fill in over Christian's objections. Soon Margaret disappears and Elizabeth and Christian try to follow, catching tantalizing glimpses of her. l The two don't know if Margaret is running under her own power, under someone else's control, or to prevent someone else from capturing and controlling her, but Margaret leads Christian and Elizabeth a merry chase, leaving unexpected clues that her brother has less success at interpreting than her devotee Elizabeth. It's a delicious romp where Elizabeth displays Amelia Peabody's cardinal characteristic of never complaining and being a good sport, even in dire circumstances, such as when they end up in a medieval torture chamber. The story is a real pleasure.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Farce humorous novel by Elizabeth Peters, best for long standing fans

I am writing this review in response to two of the other written reviews.

This non-series mystery and romantic caper by ELizabeth Peters is a madcap/screwball comedy which apparently (reading the other written reviews) is trying to a listener who is not a long standing fan of Peters and her other pseudonym, Barbara Michaels. Although this is not one of my top favorites among Peters/Michaels many works, I still enjoyed it very much (4 stars). The heroine, Elizabeth, is thrown in with the Rosenbergs, mother (Margaret) and son (Christian, who is the grumpy hero). Only Margaret, who goes on the lam, knows what the heck is going on, but Christian and Elizabeth muddle through with repeated clumsy mishaps when confronting the criminals. This is definitely one of the more confusing novels by Peters so I recommend it for listening by long standing fans and not for readers/listeners who are new to Peters. Lastly, this novel is not a travelogue for Copenhagen but does contain some Scandinavian history and archeology.

For listeners who are new to Peters, I recommend trying one of her other, more sedate novels or one of her series. See the bibliography in the Wikipedia entry for Elizabeth Peters.

Recommended for people who like madcap plays like Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" or Brandon Thomas's "Charley's Aunt" or madcap movies like "Bringing Up Baby" (Katherine Hepburn and Carey Grant). These are three of my favorites for light hearted screwball entertainment containing much confusion.

(I found the narration too loud and had to turn down the volume from my usual comfort level; odd considering I am slightly deaf.)

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

What Just Happened?

As you may already know, I like to read books set in places I’ve visited so I was looking forward to this adventure in Copenhagen.

It fell flat for me. What was it? Comedy? Slapstick? A Danish Caper? Thriller-Mystery? I didn’t really get it.

Certain segments were entertaining enough, and some parts did make me laugh, I must admit… but were they supposed to?

Overall, it barely rates above a “meh”.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Light Entertainment

Rich characters but weak plot; entertaining in any case. It is a refreshing change from the usual.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars

Couldn’t finish

Can’t believe this was written by Elizabeth Peters. After the complex plots and in depth characters of the Amelia Peabody books, this one is horribly formulaic and just plain shallow. I could have maybe put up with it but the narrator is so very bad it was a pain to continue. No character portrayal in voice nor could she stick to a character. Half the time I couldn’t figure out which character was supposed to be speaking.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

The Queen’s Bathrobe

An old Elizabeth Peters book.1985?
I enjoyed it more than I thought I would.
Different from her regular Peabody stories.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Nice light listen

Any additional comments?

The narrator was nice but fast. This was a good light listen - one you don't have to concentrate on too closely. Good happily-ever-after ending. Kinda formula for Ms. Peters, but always pleasant.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Seemed rushed

Not the usual Elizabeth Peters I'm used to. Both the story and the performance seemed rushed At times it seemed the narrator was shouting the words and there wasn't enough distinction between the voices of the two main characters,

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Mercurial

This is a hard tale for one who is seeking patterns, sensibility or integrity. Mostly the tone bounced between imminent danger and frivolity like a ping pong ball. The regularity of this bounce was more reliable than anything in the plot. Is Margaret in danger or is she gaming us? Should we chase clues frenetically as if there’s a timer on a bomb? Or let’s skip it, drink beer and go sightseeing? Similarly, which attitude will Christian take from one sentence to the next?
It was difficult to know how to listen but maybe like a song where you can’t get the lyrics, just follow the rhythm. With that attitude established, the tune was fairly pleasant.
Spoiler alert: of the two women in Christian’s life, one is consistently helpless and one is not.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Not Amelia, but Not a Problem

The characters in this book are not our favorite Emerson Family, but they are just as easy to like and fun to hear incidental, real-world data to look up and enjoy!!!