1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
The Devil Takes You Home  By  cover art

The Devil Takes You Home

By: Gabino Iglesias
Narrated by: Jean-Marc Berne
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $29.65

Buy for $29.65

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

From an award-winning author comes a genre-defying thriller about a father desperate to salvage what's left of his family—even if it means a descent into violence.

Buried in debt due to his young daughter’s illness, his marriage at the brink, Mario reluctantly takes a job as a hitman, surprising himself with his proclivity for violence. After tragedy destroys the life he knew, Mario agrees to one final job: hijack a cartel’s cash shipment before it reaches Mexico. Along with an old friend and a cartel-insider named Juanca, Mario sets off on the near-suicidal mission, which will leave him with either a cool $200,000 or a bullet in the skull. But the path to reward or ruin is never as straight as it seems. As the three complicated men travel through the endless landscape of Texas, across the border and back, their hidden motivations are laid bare alongside nightmarish encounters that defy explanation. One thing is certain: even if Mario makes it out alive, he won’t return the same.

The Devil Takes You Home is a panoramic odyssey for fans of S.A. Cosby’s southern noir, Blacktop Wasteland, by way of the boundary-defying storytelling of Stephen Graham Jones and Silvia Moreno-Garcia. 

©2022 Gabino Iglesias (P)2022 Mulholland Books

Critic Reviews

One of Harper’s Bazaar's Best, Buzziest New Books of 2022

One of Crimereads 16 Horror Novels to Look Out for This Year

"Pure noir, overflowing with the rage and sorrow of our times, The Devil Takes You Home is brutal, hallucinatory, and somehow, beautiful. This novel confirms what some of us already knew: Gabino Iglesias is a fierce, vital voice." (Paul Tremblay, best-selling author of Survivor Song)

"Some nightmares you wake from just leave you in an even worse nightmare. And then Gabino Iglesias holds his hand out from that darkness, takes you home." (Stephen Graham Jones, author of The Only Good Indians)

"An intoxicating story of a man in desperate financial straits who turns himself into a hitman and accepts a highly dangerous contract on a cartel transport operation. The job takes him and two others across Texas and further into an abyss of violence, existential dread, and paranormal happenings” (Crimereads)

What listeners say about The Devil Takes You Home

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    45
  • 4 Stars
    31
  • 3 Stars
    21
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    5
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    58
  • 4 Stars
    29
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    2
Story
  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    38
  • 4 Stars
    27
  • 3 Stars
    23
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    5

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • AJ
  • 08-03-22

Interesting story ruined by the main character.

I rarely get an audiobook with no reviews, but based on the few Amazon reviews with 5 stars I dove in. The description is the basic gist. A couple's daughter gets childhood cancer, and a tweaker, apparently his best friend because the man never mentions anyone else, gives him a hit job for some cash. And he keeps doing it. Eventually, the same meth head offers him a bigger job which includes another man, a "former cartel mule." Weird things happen.

There is a lot of Spanish. I'm somewhat conversational and from context can get the basic meaning of most, but warning to those that speak no Spanish. The main character is unlikable. From the beginning, he plays a victim of his skin color and has a seeming hatred for whites and those with money. You know it is heading this way when he says that Hispanics are more prone to childhood cancer, so even diseases are "fucking racist." When the doctor is explaining how the cancer is affecting the blood marrow, he complains that she's only explaining it because he's brown and has an accent. Later, he mentions that it is sometimes hard to follow English when Spanish is your first language and you translate everything in your head. Which is it? Was the doctor being racist or is this guy seeing everything through that lens? I find it the latter, but that's up to you. He compares an absorbent pad (the context is horrifying) to the pads rich white people put down indoors for their dogs. He hates the "fucking racist system", the "fucking racist people"...Lots of virtue signaling for a wife-beating murderer.

The other issue is the big gig they have. They are willing to risk pissing off Mexican cartels for $200,000. The main guy, Mario, is dreaming how he can pay off the massive medical bills, move to Vermont, get a house in a neighborhood with lawns, enjoy life. Yeah, sure, 200 grand will get you that far. So, I have no idea why the author chose that amount, it makes the whole thing silly.

I start to enjoy the story, and then a whole paragraph will be in Spanish, which I mostly get, or the character gives some kind of social commentary and it gets old. He gives social commentary on how humans are horrible, but stands by while horrific things are done to people of all ages. Hates rich people but wants their life, and uses his hatred and allegations of racism to justify the destruction and death he brings to get that life. Unfortunately, I don't think it is done intentionally as irony by the author.

This could have been great of the author had leaned in to the character being despicable. It also could have been a great story on religions such as Yoruba and Santeria and the use of those religions and rites by cartels, a fictionalization of the Matamoros killings, for example. Instead, I get the droning of an annoying main character I don't care about.


4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

crazy dark story

I listened to the audio of “The Devil Takes You Home” by Gabino Iglesias narrated perfectly by Jean-Marc Berne. This dark noir story is an internal narration, something like a meditation of sorts, of a desperate man, tormented by bad fortune resulting in very bad decisions.

Mario just lost his precious daughter to cancer. He and his wife racked up hundreds of thousands of dollars in hospital debt in an attempt to save their daughter. She died anyway. Mario’s wife left him, and Mario receives daily texts reminding him how much money he owes to the hospital. He is desperate.

A friend of his, Brian, who is a junky with a pregnant girlfriend, suggests that they get involved with the Mexican cartel for some quick and serious cash. When Brian introduces Mario to the head of the cartel, after Mario exchanges his pleasantries, the cartel man says:

“I was just telling your friend Mario that meeting me is never a pleasure; meeting me is something that happens to people because they have made a bad decision.”

This story is one bad decision after another. This reminded me of the Netflix series “Ozark” in that it shows how a man, trying to take care of his family, gets sucked into the harsh and disturbing world of the Cartels. Iglesias is heavy handed with religious supernatural encounters, most of them revolting and horrific. He shows how tightly religion is tied into the Cartel life.

I was happy that I chose the audio because it’s written in Spanish and English. I got to hear the Spanish spoken, which made the story more realistic in my mind. Spanglish is used frequently which wasn’t a distraction to me as I listened. I’m not a Spanish speaker, yet I enjoyed this remarkable devise he used. Bilingual readers will love it.

As with “Ozark” this is a horror-thriller. I usually stay away from such darkness, but for some reason, I found this captivating, much like watching “Ozark”. Bad news: you can’t close your eyes when it’s your imagination from reading.

I really need to find a box of puppies now…..

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Sticks with you. Be warned.

Dark, creepy, horrid and totally un-relatable. So why couldn't I stop listening ? Jeeze this is not one you can bring to the book club unless you know some hardcore tough MFs. It was suspense on steroids. Great story, pretty good narration and if you are tough enough to give it a try you might love it like I did,

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Loved the book

Wish it ended differently but super good read, or listen, would recommend to others that like this genre.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Heartbreakingly Good

Anyone who has struggled to pay the bills, suffered with the illness of a loved one, or found themselves too far down a rabbit hole where they had never intended to go will relate to this heartbreakingly good book.

As a Latinx woman who is not fluent in Spanish I think it was done excellently. It was purposeful, appropriate, and when it was important information to know for the story we always got what we needed in English.

Please read this marvelous book. Five stars!!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

2 stars is generous

This was just not my type of book. It’s all about violence, meth, the Mexican cartel. BOTM categorized it as horror, but it wasn’t even scary. I think they meant horrible. Half the book is in Spanish without context to even try to guess what he was saying or thinking. The constant talk of how racist all white people are really irked me too. I’m not sure how I suffered through this book because it was an utter waste of time.

Narrator did a good job, no complaints there.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

The most racist book I’ve ever read

Anyone who is white in this book is fair game for internal dialogues detailing their murder if they even insinuate that cartel criminals might be cartel criminals, a character violently beats another for saying he looks like a criminal 🤷‍♂️the accents are laughable, and the hamfisted crow barring in of white guilt are also terrible.this book over explains minute details and under develops the plot .
Garbage.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Listen to this story, it's impressive

I really loved the book, it made me go through a lot of human feelings: anger, fear, terror, doubt, sadness, helplessness, empathy and apathy. The pure evil in human beings, the true terror in everyone, things so damn you wish they wouldn't look like real life. I can say that you will enjoy this book very much, but you will enjoy it if you are bilingual, since the Spanish parts have a touch of Mexico, I still recommend them. Finally, it also deals with issues such as racism, inequality and lack of opportunities. if you are a gringo read it and try to understand the context of some people who lack opportunities.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Five stars for sheer emotional gravitas.

The frightening thing here is not how horrifying the world we live in is but that I think you were holding back. Without the paranormal aspects to twist reality a few degrees, I would not have stopped crying.
I cry a lot so that's not really too strange.

The story is as gorgeous as it is heartbreaking and the narration brings the foreign elements home to roost.

Although I needed a pint of ice cream when I finished this I wouldn't have traded a minute.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

A Powerful, engaging, and bloody story

Gabino Iglesias has managed something very difficult in The Devil Takes You Home. He has managed to create a rocket-fuel burning adventure story with dark magic, extreme violence, intrigue and plenty of action , while also presenting deeply resonant themes of racially-fueled pain and Latino culture. Nothing is quite as it seems, with the possible exception of the clearly defined systemic racism built into the characters, and their society.

This is not a novel of hope. This is not a novel of friendship, or good deeds. There are no heroes. It is dark, unrelenting, and passionate, as the best crime fiction always is. The elements of dark magic and supernatural creatures serve to punctuate elements of the plot, and the characters. They aren't jarring, but are prestented in ways that make them integral to the story... emphasizing the at times over-the-top character flaws, and their roots.

I listened to the audio version of this book. The narrator, Jean-Marc Berne, brought the Spanish elements to life. The characters were well-defined and the pace was smooth.

This is a very intriguing novel from a powerful voice. I am sure we will be hearing more from this author, and if we're lucky it will make its way to Hollywood. Highly Recommended.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Elaine Brien
  • Elaine Brien
  • 08-11-22

So disappointing

Struggled to finish this book, a crime novel sprinkled with supernatural elements that absolutely didn't work. After reading very good reviews I have to say this is my most disappointing book of the year so far. Suited to a short story format.