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Publisher's Summary

Can’t stop your critical thoughts? With mindfulness, you have critical thoughts… without the suffering.

From an early age, many of us have this critical voice in our head that we call the inner critic. It’s the voice that tells us:
 

  • You are not good enough.
  • You will never amount to anything.
  • You are a bad person.
  • You don’t deserve love.
  • No one loves you.
  • You can’t do it.

We have tried many different exercises and techniques to get rid of it, but nothing works. These intrusive thoughts keep popping up whenever they want. And they make us feel frustrated!

Instead of overcoming our self-criticism, we end up making the inner critic our enemy and blame ourselves for having such self-loathing thoughts. Some of us even believe that beating ourselves up is good for us and keeps our behaviors in check.

Have you tried to stop your negative thoughts? 

How is that working for you?

Self-criticism isn’t the problem. Our resistance to it is.

The truth is we can’t control most of our thoughts. Our unhealthy, habitual ways of thinking are the result of past conditioning, and they have become a part of our protective mechanism. It’s not easy to change this system overnight. 

Instead of fixing and resisting our thoughts, we can change our unconscious reactions to those judgments. Our inner critic might be unkind to us, but that doesn’t mean we have to believe everything it says. 

The reason why we continue to feel hurt by our negative self-talk is not that the words are hurtful. It’s because we are quick to believe that these harsh criticisms about us are true!

Buy The Disbelief Habit: How to Use Doubt to Make Peace with Your Inner Critic

The purpose of this audiobook is to help you be more aware and skeptical of your self-loathing thoughts.

In this book, you’ll learn:
 

  • Why you shouldn’t take your thoughts too seriously
  • Why your mind is so critical and hard on you
  • What are the four common reactions to self-criticism and how to react to your critical thoughts
  • What is and what isn’t disbelieving
  • 5 examples of how to separate the truth from the fiction
  • How to notice your unconscious reaction
  • How to identify the message that your inner critic is conveying
  • How to make doubting your new habit

The Disbelief Habit provides you the steps to practice mindfulness and make peace with your mind. Just test it out and experience the change for yourself.

©2017 Yong Kang Chan (P)2018 Yong Kang Chan

What listeners say about The Disbelief Habit: How to Use Doubt to Make Peace with Your Inner Critic

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Clear and understandable, and relevant.

I have read several books on depression, anxiety and inner critic strategies. Many are written by psychiatrists and have dense boring chapters. Some have complicated lists of tasks and goals, making it impossible to face, especially when you’re depressed. This book is neither dense nor complicated, it is written by a young man who has been through the process and it’s his insights into things that worked for him. It’s short, straightforward and easily digestible. I listened to it with my 22 yr old son who is struggling with entrenched self loathing. I myself have been through periods of depression and still tackle anxiety issues daily. We both grasped and liked this book. I think my son has balked at suggested reading to help him cope with depression because most of it is overly scientific and repetitive - and boring! I think this is a great book for a young person to listen to and start the process of self awareness and heathy thought patterns. It makes the concepts approachable and I really think it’s going to help him evaluate his consistent self criticism, and maybe change some bad habits. It made so much sense and we both were surprised how much information spoke directly to what we have both experienced. It’s short enough to listen to during a road trip, all in one go. It’s got good broad strategies for interrupting bad habits and working to install new ones. It has many useful quotes from other respected books about depression and mindfulness, which I found insightful. I felt this was totally worth the time, and I will be recommending it in the future.

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Profile Image for Kenneth Law
  • Kenneth Law
  • 12-29-18

this book opened my eyes to the real truth

I absolutely loved this book. listening to this helped make so much sense of all the junk that goes through my mind at times when I feel like I am my worst enemy. highly recommend to anybody suffering from losing battles with the inner critic