• The Forgotten Jesus

  • How Western Christians Should Follow an Eastern Rabbi
  • By: Robby Gallaty
  • Narrated by: Adam Verner
  • Length: 7 hrs and 34 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (332 ratings)

Try our newest plan – access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks, and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Plus plan is $7.95 a month after 30 day trial. Upgrade or cancel anytime.
Buy for $23.07

Buy for $23.07

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Through the years, our understanding of Jesus has been shaped by different cultural influences, and many Christians have forgotten that Jesus was a Jewish man living in a Jewish land, observing Jewish customs, and investing his life into Jewish men and women.

Trading the popular but inaccurate Western perspective of the Bible for the context in which Jesus actually ministered 2,000 years ago, author Robby Gallaty reveals the fascinating Hebraic culture, customs, and nuances many Christians have never experienced or learned about. He works from the premise that we can't truly appreciate the New Testament unless we understand the Old Testament. By uncovering the teaching of the first- and second-century rabbis and Christian theologians, and highlighting little-known Jewish idioms and traditions, Gallaty takes Christians on a biblical journey to rediscover a forgotten Jesus from a biblical perspective, deepening your relationship with God.

©2017 Robert Gallaty (P)2017 Two Words Publishing LLC

What listeners say about The Forgotten Jesus

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    253
  • 4 Stars
    54
  • 3 Stars
    19
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    3
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    213
  • 4 Stars
    43
  • 3 Stars
    23
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    227
  • 4 Stars
    34
  • 3 Stars
    14
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    2

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Helpful and Balanced

What did you love best about The Forgotten Jesus?

I appreciated the many Hebraic insights offered in this book. It seemed fair and balanced, and I especially appreciated his cautionary conclusion guiding further study and warning of the dangers of sources that might elevate Hebrew cultural studies to the level of Scriptural authority. I found his discussion contrasting the thinking and language of the Greeks vs the Hebrews quite helpful to explain many of the differences I've noticed in my own study of those languages. I very much resonated with his critique of our Greek-esque Western tendency to "educate ourselves beyond obedience." The section on the six major good shepherds (Abel, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, David and Amos) that prefigured the Messianic seventh seemed the weakest to me. Why those names and not a Job or Abraham? The selection of six seemed arbitrary though the prophetic role of Messiah as Shepherd I'm convinced is huge. Overall I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to others.

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

This is a MUST READ!

I thoroughly enjoyed this book! I’m new to Audible, and although I like it, about 1/2 way through, I ordered a paper copy. I’ll be rereading this once it comes in. There’s too much good stuff in here not to fully utilize a highlighter! For anyone who doesn’t have any background in Jewish history, prepare to have your eyes opened. I’ve been studying on this subject for almost a year and learned several more things in here. For those of us who live in America, our minds just don’t naturally go the way of the Jew... and yet, if we’ve accepted Christ, we’re not only serving one, we’ve become (grafted in) one!

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Same old Same old

This book presents itself as a radical paradigm shift for western believers. It indeed has many interesting insights, and the author demonstrates extensive biblical and cultural knowledge of 1st century Jewish society; however, it fails to utilize this solid base to argue for anything truly transformative. Everything within these pages has been better argued elsewhere. Even when the author does seem to be hitting on something that could be powerfully transformative to the heart, he seems to gloss over the significance, or lessen its impact by generalizing to the white western reader. Sadly, I don’t think this book takes enough risks, and the result is a slightly more informed portrayal of a Jesus that still fails to capture the spirit’s imagination and inspire soul transformation. I would recommend this book as a first step to someone looking to deepen their Christian perspective, and expand their spiritual walk beyond the confines of a singular western denomination; however, it offers little more than a first step.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Great insight

liked it. Great insight into the original context of Jesus' life and ministry. If you have not spend much time learning about the 1st century culture, customs, and traditions, this is an outstanding book.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Gave me much to think about

I am a longtime Christian, but I gained many new insights from this discussion. Highly recommended. The author achieves his goal: the book will make you want to dig deeper into the Bible and learn more about Jesus.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Enlightening

This is an eye opener concerning Jewish customs. I enjoyed learning and growing spiritually.

Adam Verner is a wonderful Narrator!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Interesting and insightful

Well delivered. Interesting insights presented in an engaging and accessible manner. This was much more interesting than I expected.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Loved!

This was a fantastic book for anybody wanting to know what Jesus life really was outside of the painted picture that many western Americans try to make of him!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great insights

This book has great insights into the life and teachings of Jesus. I was greatly blessed by listening to it.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

extraordinary story and reader

The story was wonderful and the reader was one of the best I've ever listened to.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for dani
  • dani
  • 07-19-22

Divine wisdom

Very insightful and beautifully narrated. Such a joy and privilege to learn about Jesus Christ from this perspective. Highly recommended

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for James Uscroft
  • James Uscroft
  • 04-10-22

The Same Old Apologetic Balogne

As an Atheist who is nonetheless deeply fascinated by the Bible and its original, ancient Hebrew context, I've thoroughly enjoyed books like "The Bible Doesn't Say That" and "Misreading Scripture With Western Eyes." Because even when I strongly disagreed with the author's interpretations and believed that they were excessively coloured by their own religious prejudices and/or agenda, I still gained something from the experience. But in this book on the other hand, Gallaty's argument essentially boils down to nothing but a) "Well Actually, My Unsupported Assertions About Ancient Hebrew Culture Prove That Jesus Did Actually Claim To Be God & Was The Messiah Because I Say So! Checkmate Liberal Christian Scholars!" And b) while the author makes a point of directly criticising Supersessionism, the deeply patronising and Jesus-centric belief that the Old Testament is nothing but the build up to the Crucifixion of Christ. And that therefore, Christians must read the Old Testament in order to fully understand how God's plan to save the world by sacrificing his son was set into motion even before he tested Abraham.

Speaking of Abraham in fact, the way that, like so many other Christian apologists before them, Gallaty reduced the story of his sacrifice of Isaac to a mere 'Preview' of the sacrifice of Jesus genuinely made me laugh out loud as they twisted themselves into the same theological pretzels that Christians have knotted themselves into for Millennia in their desperate struggle to depict it as an act of 'Love.' (Never mind the fact that according to recent scholarship, in the original version of the story, Abraham 'DID' sacrifice Isaac as a burnt offering. And the ending in which an angel stopped him was only added by a later editor because the Israelites had banned human sacrifice in the meantime.)

Beyond the apologetic gymnastics though, the fact that the author didn't even attempt to understand or explain the original, ancient Hebrew meaning and significance of the story in its own context, genuinely believing that the 'ONLY' reason that it was ever told was so that later Christians could see a parallel with Jesus was deeply disheartening. And after that, the author's unquestioning acceptance of Matthew's totally made up 'Prophecy' about Jesus being called 'The Nazarene' (in spite of also making up a contradictory story of him being born in Bethlehem,) and of the long debunked 'Branch' apologetic that was invented to explain it killed any respect that I had left for them, along with any hope that I had left for this book. Because when a Christian gushes about the amazing prophecy fulfilments of the New Testament, asking the rest of us to explain how stories written down decades after Jesus' death by Greek speaking Jews who probably had a copy of the Septuagint open while they were writing (hence mistranslating 'Young/Unmarried Woman' as 'Virgin,' etc,) could possibly echo, reflect and fulfil the prophecies of the Old Testament so completely, (and yet still so inaccurately and messily that they had to literally 'Invent' at least one prophecy that they claimed was fulfilled,) then you know that you're wasting your time.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Mati
  • Mati
  • 03-03-21

Good but too Evangelical

I found this book to be too biased towards American Evangelicalism. It seemed like it was written with an American Christian audience in mind.