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Publisher's Summary

From the New York Times best-selling author of Start with Why and Leaders Eat Last, a bold framework for leadership in today’s ever-changing world.

How do we win a game that has no end? Finite games, like football or chess, have known players, fixed rules, and a clear endpoint. The winners and losers are easily identified. Infinite games, games with no finish line, like business or politics, or life itself, have players who come and go. The rules of an infinite game are changeable, while infinite games have no defined endpoint. There are no winners or losers - only ahead and behind.

The question is, how do we play to succeed in the game we’re in?

In this revelatory new audiobook, Simon Sinek offers a framework for leading with an infinite mindset. On one hand, none of us can resist the fleeting thrills of a promotion earned or a tournament won, yet these rewards fade quickly. In pursuit of a just cause, we will commit to a vision of a future world so appealing that we will build it week after week, month after month, year after year. Although we do not know the exact form this world will take, working toward it gives our work and our life meaning.

Leaders who embrace an infinite mindset build stronger, more innovative, more inspiring organizations. Ultimately, they are the ones who lead us into the future.

©2018 Simon Sinek (P)2018 Penguin Audio

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Editor's Pick

An entirely different view of work
"Simon Sinek is a magnetic speaker. He boils down complicated business trends into simple language, and presents them in a calm measured manner that makes it both fun to listen to and easy to come to terms with. Infinite Game is the first audiobook of his I’ve listened to and I have to say I really enjoy his narration. His concepts and ideas are pretty far-reaching, and certainly idealistic, but I do think they need to be heard. Attitude, and perspective, is everything in business—even more so when confronting the day in day out grind of making money, and Sinek delivers the big ideas that can help each of us better understand what we are working for. If you are looking for something to challenge routine thinking, and help you adjust your mindset—whether it be towards your work, personal life, or otherwise—this is an excellent place to start."
Michael D., Audible Editor

What listeners say about The Infinite Game

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Just go watch his TED Talks on the subject

I think Simon is great. The way he approaches this issue, as well as, his work on millineals (SP) is top notch. I have heard time speak, and watch many of his TED talks on this subject. Naturally, alot of overlap. I think your better off watching the TED talks and getting than listening to the audio book

47 people found this helpful

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  • KN
  • 11-16-19

Falls short. Examples seem off or dated.

I love Mr. Sinek’s work. I am however disappointed in this book. Simon had leaned heavily on the past, and provided examples that are questionable. His admiration for Apple is well known. However, no mention of how Tim Cook is in fact playing the infinite game. Simon talks at length about Microsoft’s past mistakes and yet ignores how the current CEO has completely changed the company by playing the long game. He talks about American Airlines which is struggling, making no mention of Delta which has show how airlines can play the infinite game.

Mr. Sinek’s message is spot on and the book could have been even more powerful had he researched the companies he cites in the book, with an eye for currency and industry leaders - whose CEOs are in fact better playing the infinite game.

Good book. Could have been better.

62 people found this helpful

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I love Sinek but...

I’ve loved Simon Sinek, but as an economics student, I couldn’t get through the fourth chapter of this book without cringing at his lack of fluency in economic history. To put forth the assertion that companies cared about their employees and everything was hunky-dory until Milton Friedman came along in the 70’s and taught companies to be greedy is to blatantly ignore the bulk of 20th century American economic history. Sinek asserts that massive layoffs to meet projections were unthinkable before the 1970s, then quotes Henry Ford saying that companies need to exist to do more than make money a few sentences later. Henry Ford is the same guy who said the problem with unemployment during the depression is that no one would do an honest day’s work, and then promptly laid off a couple thousand employees a couple weeks later.

When Sinek said that speculation by by investment bankers “caused the Great Depression,” I had to stop listening. If Edward Tufte isn’t comfortable saying definitively what “caused” the Great Depression, Sinek sure as hell shouldn’t be.

While I think the premise of this book is sound, The lack of economic historical literacy that Sinek displays in supporting his argument undermines the books entire premise. This shoddy level of research is, in my opinion, far beneath Sinek, and certainly shouldn’t have made it past the editors of this book. The idea of the infinite/finite game is sound. But as it stands now, Sinek selectively interprets the business events of the 20th century to defend it. I expect better.

155 people found this helpful

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A great way of thinking!

I loved this book. There are so many great nuggets that I am going to put into practice at my company. Anyone in business today should read this - you may not be able to change your company or situation - but armed with the perspectives you will be able to navigate the business world better because you read it.

17 people found this helpful

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Timeless content

Amazing book. Simon lays out principles and guidelines that are timeless; would work in any culture, at any age, for every walk of life. I took in the whole book and can't wait to give it another read soon.

8 people found this helpful

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Relates to every facet of life, not just business

I knew this idea of an infinite mindset before reading the book. But now it’s understood in technicolor. Our just cause will direct our next steps with conviction and purpose. If you’re stuck, this will give you healthy direction

2 people found this helpful

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Incredibly superficial anecdotal framing of world

The title was really appealing and the first chapter sets out for a good start as it describes in detail the difference between a company like Microsoft and Apple in the Smartphone-Wars. Unfortunately where normally some social scientific rigour would follow and studies by giants such as Dan Ariely or Jim Collins would be cited – NONE of that; the author just leaves us with his mind and his storytelling techniques. Would not recommend. Instead use scientifically crafted works such as Jump-Starting America by Jonathan Gruber and Simon Johnson that essentially tell a similar critique of short-termism but can back it up with facts and figures.

2 people found this helpful

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Another Excellent Book from Simon Sinek

The concept of Infinite Game applies to situations where there is no end, no true winners or losers. A company claiming to be the "best" is subjective. And being the best according to their own measurement doesn't ensure the longevity of the company. A leader who play the Infinite Game is a steward of the company. It's not just about his/her career in the company but also that the company is robust enough that it will be around for future generations. Leaders who plays the Infinite Game know to create an environment where people feel safe to express their opinions, embrace core values in their policies and practices, behave ethically, and build trust. The last few chapters on ethics and trust will sound familiar as there are already many books on these topics.

2 people found this helpful

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Simon has done it again...

He has written a book that perpetuates his cause by guiding future and current leaders to change their thinking on how they're going to lead or currently leading those in their charge. I thoroughly enjoyed his book and can't wait for the next one.

8 people found this helpful

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Great material flat presentation

I found the material of the book inspiring. However the reading was flat. Maybe my expectations were too high as I have seen the authors TED talks and was expecting the same dynamic presentation in this book.

7 people found this helpful