1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
The Kraken Wakes  By  cover art

The Kraken Wakes

By: John Wyndham
Narrated by: John Sackville
Try for $0.00

$14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Buy for $16.35

Buy for $16.35

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

Ships are sinking for no apparent reason, carrying hundreds to a dark underwater grave. Strange fireballs race through the sky above the deepest trenches of the oceans. Something is about to show itself, something terrible and alien, a force capable of causing global catastrophe.

©1953 John Wyndham (P)2022 Audible, Ltd

What listeners say about The Kraken Wakes

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    7
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Story resonates today - chilling and brilliant

The story is one of its time and of our time. In the 1950s a fear of nuclear war ending civilization was often channeled into invasion dramas - and in this original story the attack starts from outer space and continues from below the waves. The difficulty of discovery, and people’s skepticism and denial resonate with climate change today. The science of the story still feels modern even if the communications and social networking rely on analogue radio and numerous dinner parties. The political divisions of the world distracting from a unified response to an existential threat are familiar and regrettable. The most chilling episodes include London overflowing with icy water as sea levels rise, and the gradual retreat and unraveling of the social order. Some historical quirks to enjoy are how thoroughly untechnical most of the people are in the discussions. In the intervening years, we all know what ultrasonic waves are, for example, although at the time they were relatively obscure military technology. And there is a peculiar sentiment about the quality of technology and construction from Asia compared to that from the West, although this is introduced early on only to be contradicted by the end of the book. Having read this in the 1970s and hearing it in this laudable performance today, it focuses perhaps a little too much on the media response to such a crisis and the ending, while clever, is slightly unsatisfying. However it is still a masterpiece, on a par with his other works and one that future generations may see as even more prophetic.

The performance is very good with excellent feeling and clearly recognizable vocalization of the different characters. (There is an unfortunate lapse in pronouncing latitude and longitude as degrees and feet rather than degrees minutes and seconds mentioned only since it might be worth a quick edit to fix it.)