• The Life We're Looking For

  • Reclaiming Relationship in a Technological World
  • By: Andy Crouch
  • Narrated by: Andy Crouch
  • Length: 5 hrs and 55 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (38 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $24.50

Buy for $24.50

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

A deeply reflective primer on creating meaningful connections, rebuilding abundant communities, and living in a way that engages our full humanity in an age of unprecedented anxiety and loneliness—from the author of The Tech-Wise Family

“Andy Crouch shows the path to reclaiming a life that restores the heart of what it means to thrive.”—Arthur C. Brooks, #1 New York Times bestselling author of From Strength to Strength 

Our greatest need is to be recognized—to be seen, loved, and embedded in rich relationships with those around us. But for the last century, we’ve displaced that need with the ease of technology. We’ve dreamed of mastery without relationship (what the premodern world called magic) and abundance without dependence (what Jesus called Mammon). Yet even before a pandemic disrupted that quest, we felt threatened and strangely out of place: lonely, anxious, bored amid endless options, oddly disconnected amid infinite connections.

In The Life We’re Looking For, best-selling author Andy Crouch shows how we have been seduced by a false vision of human flourishing—and how each of us can fight back. From the social innovations of the early Christian movement to the efforts of entrepreneurs working to create more humane technology, Crouch shows how we can restore true community and put people first in a world dominated by money, power, and devices.

There is a way out of our impersonal world, into a world where knowing and being known are the heartbeat of our days, our households, and our economies. Where our vulnerabilities are seen not as something to be escaped but as the key to our becoming who we were made to be together. Where technology serves us rather than masters us—and helps us become more human, not less.

©2022 Andy Crouch (P)2022 Random House Audio

What listeners say about The Life We're Looking For

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    30
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    26
  • 4 Stars
    3
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    25
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A true gift

Andy’s gift to us through written word summarizes the life we truly are looking for and I’m extremely grateful for someone who uses his gift to articulate the history and inheritance we have and can have through a life of love inspired by Jesus to be thousand generation children of the Living God.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Way too much scripture

I was interested in the premise of this book - the idea that we are losing to technology that which makes us real persons. However, I kept waiting for the book to get to a 'so what' and it never did. Instead, the entire second half of the book is simply Bible verses, and I had no idea that I had picked up this book as a substitute for church. Perhaps I should have done my due diligence on the book and author beforehand. The preachy nature of the author without actually prescribing anything real falls super flat, and he fails to provide many sources at all other than scripture. Regardless of your beliefs, I wouldn't recommend taking the time to listen to this one - nothing new, nothing useful.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Great Analysis of the Battlefield of Life

I have never seen the concept of mammon so clearly illustrated. I needed this warning more than I realized!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Deep, rich and inspiring

Beautifully read by the author. A really insightful analysis of our relationship to technology and the new world we now live in. it is not only bleak, it is hopeful and reassuring: we can be persons even in this world of depersonalization.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

More religious than I would have guessed

I read a lot of books in this space and this is the first time I've run across one that's overtly religious. It started off secular enough, but most of the end of the book is about Jesus and the Christian God. If that's your jam, great. But I felt a little bamboozled by it.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Thought provoking call to a fuller life.

Thought provoking look at the effects of technology on our daily lives and a call to fundamentally rethink not only how we interact with that technology, but how we interact with others in society. The book does not lay blame for the disconnectedness of our society at technology’s feet. Rather, it argues that a larger force, Mammon, is at work in our modern age that aims to replace the relational with the transactional.

The solution is to rethink the purpose of technology in our lives. Technology should function only as an instrument to assist in the expression of our heart, soul, mind, and strength. Technologies that promise to replace those expressions have negative long-term consequences individually and for society.

Other themes include a call to intentionally engage in relationships and community, caring for those that cannot care for themselves, and understanding our place in the long arc of history.

As an engineer engaged in applying technology in manufacturing (automation), I found this book to be particularly worth the read.