• The Magna Carta of Humanity

  • Sinai’s Revolutionary Faith and the Future of Freedom
  • By: Os Guinness
  • Narrated by: Os Guinness
  • Length: 15 hrs and 16 mins
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (67 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

In these stormy times, loud voices from all fronts call for revolution and change.

But what kind of revolution brings true freedom to both society and the human soul? Cultural observer Os Guinness explores the nature of revolutionary faith, contrasting between secular revolutions such as the French Revolution and the faith-led revolution of ancient Israel. He argues that the story of Exodus is the highest, richest, and deepest vision for freedom in human history. It serves as the master story of human freedom and provides the greatest sustained critique of the abuse of power. His contrast between “Paris” and “Sinai” offers a framework for discerning between two kinds of revolution and their different views of human nature, equality, and liberty. 

Drawing on the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures, Guinness develops Exodus as the Magna Carta of humanity, with a constructive vision of a morally responsible society of independent free people who are covenanted to each other and to justice, peace, stability, and the common good of the community. This is the model from the past that charts our path to the future. 

“There are two revolutionary faiths bidding to take the world forward”, Guinness writes. “There is no choice facing America and the West that is more urgent and consequential than the choice between Sinai and Paris. Will the coming generation return to faith in God and to humility, or continue to trust in the all sufficiency of Enlightenment reason, punditry, and technocracy? Will its politics be led by principles or by power?” While Guinness cannot predict our ultimate fate, he warns that we must recognize the crisis of our time and debate the issues openly. As individuals and as a people, we must choose between the revolutions, between faith in God and faith in reason alone, between freedom and despotism, and between life and death.

©2021 Originally published by InterVarsity Press as The Magna Carta of Humanity by Os Guinness. © 2021 by Os Guinness (P)2021 Blackstone Publishing
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

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Great book

Another great book by Os Guinness. He is a modern day profit. Well worth the time reading it.

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Os gives another excellent commentary on America

Long book. did I say long??? ok, it was long!!!
I noticed several concepts that are mentioned in his other books but they applied here as well.
loved the reference to Rabbi Sacks writings as I read his stuff as well.

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Full of wisdom masked in religion.

There is so much wisdom in this book. If you don’t believe in god, it can be off pudding hearing so much about Exodus and the “proof” that is encapsulated in it. But if you keep an open mind at the propositions he makes, there is brilliance in his words.

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  • Joseph V Z
  • 04-24-22

Sadly, No answers here!

To search for answers it is important we go beyond familiar paths and sources. So l approached this book with open-minded optimism. I struggled in vain to sift the gold from the sand. There is too much emphasis on God. God in one particular incarnation, a God, not of all mankind but those True Believers of the Christian-Judeo faiths.

And that is the problem, Humanity encompasses All Mankind, whether they are brethren or not, atheists, Buddhist, Muslims, Hindus, or not, capitalists or not.....

Any analysis of the way forward should do likewise. To preach to the converted as Os does here, is understandable ( after I sought out his resume), but utterly unfulfilling.

Rather than throw out the baby with the bath water, I hope that Os, or others can address the issue again with greater rigor and in collaboration with those who have divergent views, but similar good intentions. If as Os understands, his God created Man in his likenesses then he can not pick and choose, which of God's likeness we should follow at the exclusion of others. Only after accepting our heterogeneity can we hope to find a path forwards that reserves a place for all on this lifeboat we call "Earth".

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  • Steven Davis
  • 03-09-22

An absolutely tremendous contribution

The Magna Carta of Humanity gives to us Os Guinness at his intellectual, academic and sociological best. The presentation, which is narrated by Os Guinness with urgency and passion and great clarity has the listener and reader thinking constantly about the choice that America has to contend with in the coming years. 1776 or 1789? Which Revolution? Sinai or Paris? Which foundation will we go forward with as a nation? Freedom or no freedom? An absolutely essential read for those who are seriously concerned about the state of Western Democracy and the United States in particular. The Magna Carta of Humanity’ brings the very best of Os Guinness’ intellectual, academic and emotional maturity to our minds and hearts. He makes an urgent and impassioned plea (primarily to Americans) for us in the West to consider the foundations and contrasting outcomes of the Revolutions of 1776 (US) and 1789 (Paris) with a view to ‘choosing’ one over the other as distinctively and unequivocally related to true freedom. Os Guinness aims to confront us with what he understands is the unmistakable differences between the two revolutions. Os Guinness plainly states that the United States is presently immersed between the two ‘revolutions’ and must come to a decision for it’s own and the world’s sake to return to the principles which founded the revolution of 1776. An absolutely wonderful and insightful contribution to a vital discussion that we must have.