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Publisher's Summary

This collection of short stories is a good example of early Wodehouse. It is here that Jeeves makes his first appearance with these unremarkable words: "Mrs. Gregson to see you, sir." Years later, when Jeeves became a household name, Wodehouse said he blushed to think of the off-hand way he had treated the man at their first encounter...In the story "Extricating Young Gussie," we find Bertie Wooster's redoubtable Aunt Agatha "who had an eye like a man-eating fish and had got amoral suasion down to a fine point." The other stories are also fine vintage Wodehouse: the romance between a lovely girl and a would-be playwright, the rivalry between the ugly policeman and Alf the romeo milkman, and the plight of Henry in the title piece, The Man with Two Left Feet, who fell in love with a dance hostess.

What listeners say about The Man with Two Left Feet and Other Stories

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • D
  • 08-28-10

Chapters don't cue to the stories

The narration sounds exemplary so far, but I must complain that the six+ hours of audio is divided into ten "Chapters" that don't cue to the stories. There should be 13 short stories, it would be nice if there were 13 "Chapters" and they each cued to the beginning of a story.

10 people found this helpful

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The incomparable Fredrick Davidson reading a Wodehouse classic

What a great surprise find! Clever humor in classic Wodehouse style, but it’s Fredrick Davidson’s reading that puts this in my list of among the best audio performances I’ve heard.

2 people found this helpful

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Early Wodehouse, Great for Any Fan

Any fan of Wodehouse must read/listen to these early works. While not as commonly known as his Jeeves and Wooster series, they show the early outlines of the character types that so endear his later works to fans. Listen and enjoy!

1 person found this helpful

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Touching Stories

Unlike some of PGW’s later works, which make me question how he feels about humanity, these short stories have heart and some genuine emotion in them. I am a fan of his wacky literary devices, but here it’s more a matter of showing how people take care of each other. I will probably listen again.

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Great lesser known short stories

I thought I had read all the PGD so was happy to find these lesser known charming short stories. Really enjoyed the narrator as well

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Includes a dog story, chapter 5

A mixture of variable quality. Some of the love stories were sweet, I enjoyed chapters 6 and 7 more than the rest.
I’m a sucker for any story with a dog. PGW bravely writes a first person narrative of a dog’s life and perspective. Others have attempted similar and I think it is a good measure of an author’s overall ability. Wodehouse ranks well up there. Chapter 5 is a treat.

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Written When PGW Was Still Learning to Dance.

As with The Man Upstairs and Other Stories, you don’t want to start your excursion into the world of Wodehouse here. Turn instead to his earliest gems, like Psmith in the City, Something Fresh, Ukridge, The Clicking of Cuthbert or The Inimitable Jeeves; you’ll be getting in on the ground floor of five hilarious, ongoing sagas.

For those of us who’ve already imbibed those, this collection offers different pleasures: glimpses of Wodehouse’s emerging style; surprise at his already well-developed powers of characterization. Collected and published three years after The Man Upstairs, these stories come a tad or two closer to his later achievement. Knowing what he did achieve, it’s fun to hear the apprentice work that got him there. And it sounds even better when Frederick Davidson reads it.

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Not the best Wodehouse, but Wodehouse nonetheless.

This is an enjoyable and entertaining bunch of short stories. They are not quite as stunningly witty as some later pieces, but they are still a fun listen.