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Publisher's Summary

If you try to assassinate your boss - even though brainwashed at the time - you must pay the price. To redeem himself James Bond is sent to kill one of the most lethal hit men in the world…Paco "Pistols" Scaramanga. In the sultry heat of Jamaica, 007 infiltrates his target's criminal cooperative - only to find that Scaramanga's bullets are laced with snake venom. When the end comes, every shot will count.

This audiobook includes an exclusive bonus interview with Kenneth Branagh.

Blackstone Audio, Inc. James Bond and 007 are registered trademarks of Danjaq LLC, used under license by Ian Fleming Publications Ltd

©1965 Ian Fleming (P)2014 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Featured Article: The Definitive Guide to James Bond’s Gadgets, Gear, and Gizmos


Celebrated super spy James Bond is as well known for his gadgets as he is for his libido, his shaken martinis, and his fancy cars. While the Bond novels mention various widgets, the translation to film gave the special effects crew a lot more to work with. As a result, the clever tools and tricked-out weapons Bond uses on screen are perhaps even more impressive—and outlandish—than those featured in the books.

What listeners say about The Man with the Golden Gun

Average Customer Ratings
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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Good combination of book and narrator

This is a short Bond novel and feels like it needs a little filling out, which I guess isn't a surprise, as this was the novel Flemming was working on before he died, and he (reportedly) was never really satisfied with the result. However, it still has the structure and characters of a good story, and combined with a wonderful narrator (Kenneth Branagh), it was a very good listening experience. I particularly like this Bond villain, Scaramanga, for his easy attitude and bravado, and I also like the setting of Jamaica in the 60s. The written character of Bond is much more complex and self-reflective than that in most of the Bond movies (even though it's not as fleshed out in this novel), and it's a Bond I like. And there's still good action and attraction, just like people expect of Bond in movies and books.

6 people found this helpful

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Not only secret but secure

"The past could be forgiven, but not forgotten – except with the passage of time."
- Ian Fleming, The Man with the Golden Gun

I can't really call this an unfinished novel. It was finished, just not by Ian Fleming. He wrote the first draft and died. So, this obviously is the last James Bond novel. I'm not enough of a Ian Fleming fan to recognize how/where/if the lack of Ian Fleming made a huge difference to the drafting. I think the end of the novel, with Jones refusing certain honors, may not have found their way into the final novel if Ian Fleming were in control through the whole process. It seemed too final, too sentimental.

This novel returns Bond to active duty after losing his memory in the last novel. It also sends Bond back to Jamaica. It was good Bond, just not great bond. Seemed like a comfortable Ian Fleming wrting from a confident spot. The shootout was a bit of a disappointment, but Scaramanga’s last few moments were spectacular.

5 people found this helpful

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A Second Chance

James Bond has recovered his memory, with the help of the KGB, no less, and has consequently been manipulated into attempting to assassinate M. After undoing the Soviet brainwashing, M sends 007 on a job to eliminate a dangerous hitman, as a means of redemption and rehabilitation. This novel is weaker than most of the others—it lacks the suspense and charm of the previous novel—though it is by no means bad. It still contains the essential elements: an intriguing woman, a unique villain, and an exotic location, but the "Man with the Golden Gun" is too flamboyant to take seriously, and the novel's comparatively short length and resultant quick pace make it difficult for the narrative to grasp the reader's attention. Kenneth Branagh's narration is good, though, as would be expected from such a prominent acting talent.

1 person found this helpful

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Love Kenneth Branagh

The story is about what you expect from James Bond and a host of villains. Kenneth Branagh makes the story very listenable with excellent characterizations

1 person found this helpful

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Amazing

One of the best audiobooks mostly due to the narrator. Kenneth Branagh is amazing and so good at accents, I actually thought that some characters were played by someone else entirely. Loved the performance!!

1 person found this helpful

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Kevin Branagh Excels!

The Man with the Golden Gun has come to life again for me after having read it for the first time 50 years earlier. Kevin Branagh mastery of storytelling coupled with his prowess for creating believable character voices and personalities is without equal and very entertaining. This was truly fun filled and exciting revisit of a classic Bond thriller.

1 person found this helpful

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Great Listen

This book had an excellent performance by Kenneth Branagh. The plot isn't as good as I'd hoped but still a fun listen!

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Branagh stars in many voices

Fleming isn't really much of a writer and the plot creaks and stumbles but Branagh puts real life into what would otherwise be a plod.

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007

I have seen all the bond movies but the first time I have heard the book. the movies always made bond superhuman while the audio made him real.i actually enjoyed him being a regular man

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Great Performance

Branagh's performance alone makes this book worth a listen. Talented stage / film actors do not always make good voice actors, but Branagh well captures the mood of the novel and animates the American English speaking villain without failing into a caricature.

Man with the Golden Gun feels like a short story, mainly in the focus on the confrontation between Bond and the villain at the expense of all else. it is somewhat disappointing and somewhat perplexing that Fleming doesn't tackle larger themes; he teases the politicization of the sugar industry, for example, which offers a more nuanced suspense thriller, but instead settles for a shootout reminiscent of Hollywood cowboys. I don't possess the Fleming "lore" to explain this as a result of Fleming's illness or perhaps Fleming writing solely for a pay day. Golden Gun also follows the Bond formula of an opening action scene which is mostly unrelated to the rest of the novel. It goes almost without saying that Golden Gun again reflects Fleming's knowledge of and love for Jamaica.

Potential listeners should not let the 1974 film of the same name deter them from listening to this book. The film is cartoonish and bears almost no resemblance to the book.