• The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution

  • By: Kevin R.C. Gutzman
  • Narrated by: Tom Weiner
  • Length: 6 hrs and 34 mins
  • 4.4 out of 5 stars (604 ratings)

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The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution

By: Kevin R.C. Gutzman
Narrated by: Tom Weiner
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Publisher's Summary

Instead of the system that the U.S. Constitution intended, judges have created a system in which bureaucrats and appointed officials make most of the important policies. While the government claims to be a representative republic, somehow hot-button topics, from gay marriage to the allocation of Florida's presidential electors, always seem to be decided by unelected judges. What gives them the right to decide such issues? The judges say it's the Constitution.

Author and law professor Kevin Gutzman shows that there is very little relationship between the Constitution ratified by the 13 states more than two centuries ago and the "constitutional law" imposed upon us since then. The Constitution guarantees our rights and freedoms, but activist judges are threatening those very rights because of the Supreme Court's willingness to substitute its own opinions for the perfectly constitutional laws enacted by "we, the people" through our elected representatives.

©2007 Kevin R.C. Gutzman, J.D., Ph.D (P)2007 Blackstone Audio Inc.
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

What listeners say about The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

The best PIG to date

I have read or listened to nearly every one of the "Politically Incorrect Guide" series since I first found Thomas E. Woods Jr.'s "Politically Incorrect Guide to American History". While all of these books are good, some are better than others. If I had to pick one for it's historical insight, accurate articulation of ideas and concepts, and fascinating evaluations of legal rulings, it would be Kevin R. C. Gutzman's "Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution". I would consider this book a "must read" for anyone interested in American History or the US Legal system.

36 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Right about so many things

As a professor at a law school, I can attest that Mr. Gutzman gets it right! One of the biggest problems with legal education is the case study method. We have lost the history and the spirit of The Constitution and get mired in the self-made law of the SCOTUS. I agree that one way to fix this is to fix our legal education system. The history and interpretation of the cases cited in this book and what they mean to the death of the Constitution makes you cringe. Because its true.

25 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

The Supremes never STOP in the name of love

Audio: Excellent. Clear, well-enunciated, easy to understand. The narrator does read fairly quickly. I didn't do much rewinding but due to the interesting subject matter and innumerable cases mentioned I will be listening to this book many times.

Content: EDUCATIONAL. Was there ever a time "The Supremes" didn't legislate from the bench? Did they EVER adhere to the Constitution other than its' legend as perceived "in their own minds"? Sigh. "What hath God wraught?" It's a wonder we retain ANY inalienable rights anymore, but that was the DOI, wasn't it? The subject matter is presented in a manner that holds ones' interest. Since it is a P.I.G. book there is a moderate amount of sarcasm, but only as appropriate. I highly recommend this book for those with a personal interest in either America history or their own future in America.

24 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Arch Conservative perspective

It's great to listen to a well reasoned argument for a morally bankrupt position. This book, which contains a case for strict constitutionalism, is 100% correct in terms of nominal law (laws on the books) but 100% off-base in terms of natural law (what is right and wrong). If the author had his way, we would still have slavery and we would not be a united country. That being said, the author is absolutely correct in his criticisms of the notion of "constitutional law". Draw your own conclusions from this conundrum. A good read.

18 people found this helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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  • 07-14-15

Should be called Incorrect Guide to Constitution

What disappointed you about The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution?

I try to be kind in reviewing books and practice what my parents taught me: if you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all. I am sensitive to the fact that every book is someone's artistic creation and baby. I make an exception here because I fear people may purchase this book with the belief it may be educational. This book is most certainly not educational. Essentially this book cries over the spilled milk of American history and lays the misinterpretation of the Constitution at the feet of the judiciary. At certain points the author ignores what actually happened in history or the words of the Constitution itself. For example, the "necessary and proper" clause does not actually mean the Congress has the power to pass those laws necessary and proper to carry out the Constitution. The most frightening example of mischaracterization was saved for Marburry v. Madison, one of the most important cases in American Jurisprudence. The author stated the most important concept taken from the case want the power of judicial review, but rather, the power of a court to lecture elected officials. This statement is not only wrong but patently absurd. The three branches of government and various political factions had always lectured and fought with each other. This case most certainly did, in fact, establish the power of judicial review.

What could Kevin R.C. Gutzman have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Get facts straight, stop trying to force an agenda down my throat, accurately report historical events, accurately report holdings of court decisions and outcomes, provide counter point, pick one.

What does Tom Weiner bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

N/A nothing was wrong with narration.

What character would you cut from The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Constitution?

N/A

Any additional comments?

I purchased this book assuming it would be light or funny or satirical or at least educational. I really looked forward to listening to the book and was sad to find this was mostly an agenda driven rant. If I could give 0 stars I would. :-(

13 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

A reality check on Constitution

The U.S. Constitution was written and ratified by the founding fathers of America to be a system of government. The whole misguided notion of it being a living document is specious. This book is well worth the time time it takes to listen.

11 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

One of my new favorite books

I expect to listen to this book at least 2 times. The author mentions other books as his sources and I will try to read those next.

I recently developed a casual interest in the Constitution and this book is flipping my mind like nothing before except for when I was studying Calculus. I would recommend it to anybody I know. It is changes my perspective.

11 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Interesting

There were many things that have been forgotten about the Constitution, and this book really helps to bring those facts to life.

8 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

The US Supreme Court acts as a monarchy

The author does not explicitly write what I state in the review headline above, but he demonstrates through case after case that the Supreme Court rules as it sees fit without regard to the US Constitution and equally without regard to the states, the presidency, or the Congress. The majority of the court at any time effectively rules all aspects of the lives of US citizens as it alone sees fit. This book does not discuss the inferior circuit and district courts at length, but the judges in those courts are often even less careful to rule according to the Constitution and the laws than the Supremes. To quote one prior member of the high court. "We are not supreme because we are infallible, we are supreme because we are final."

I do not agree with the author in his evaluation of all of the presented cases, but I agree in most such cases.

7 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

The federal judiciary has gone rouge

For years, I have been frustrated at the Federal Court's handling of cases that seem to go against what our founding fathers obviously intended. This book opened my eyes to a history of the federal judiciary ignoring our Constitution while at the same time claiming to uphold it.

6 people found this helpful

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  • Hank
  • 12-23-18

good read though hard to follow at times

this was a very informative. was hard to digest and follow as it was being narrated and I had to continually back track to catch the point(s). otherwise having known nothing about the constitution and being a non-American this was very illuminating. the basic guts of the book is that before the USA came into being there existed 13 colonies that considered themselves sovereign nations and that the constitution was created for trade and military purposes should another war erupt as it just did with British (in which the colonies prevailed). the constitution was created to ensue this sovereignty while allowing the colonies to come together for trade and war allies purposes. thereafter however the constitution has strayed from this to being the final judicial authority of even the most menial matter, overruling the states sovereignty in such matters. the evolution of this process is what this book is all about. the author is an advocate of the constitution's original purpose. highly recommend for an understanding of the Jeffersonian perspective of the constitution.

1 person found this helpful