• The Prose Edda

  • The Rasmus Björn Anderson Translation
  • By: Snorri Sturluson
  • Narrated by: Collin Moore
  • Length: 3 hrs and 28 mins
  • 4.9 out of 5 stars (89 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Eight hundred years ago, an heir to the Vikings collected their myths and wrote them down. Here are those original tales of Odin and Thor, magic and might, presented for your listening enjoyment.

The Prose Edda (also known as Snorri's Edda or The Younger Edda) is a manual of poetics written by Snorri Sturluson around the year 1220. In it, Snorri compiled the old myths and legends of the Norsemen, in order that poets from his time might draw on these stories to keep the Icelandic-Viking heritage alive. 

Although they are a secondary source, they remain one of our oldest references for the original Norse Myths, as the Vikings themselves told them.

©2020 Ayrton Parham (P)2020 Ayrton Parham

What listeners say about The Prose Edda

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Well-performed, but the names are tough going

I enjoyed this. It’s very well-read, and the translation — although it’s a bit old-fashioned, and a little “cleaner” than the original, to judge by a comparison with Jesse Byock’s version — is easy enough to follow…. with one exception. As happens so often with these medieval texts, and it seems Scandinavian and German texts for me in particular, the names are difficult to catch in audio. It may be my hearing: I like to see the names spelled out, and sometimes it’s as if I can’t quite “hear” them if I can’t see them. Fortunately a number of the names appear in the chapter headings, which are incorporated into the file. A PDF listing ALL the names (perhaps in order of appearance) would be a welcome addition.

Having just listened to the Ukemi recording of the Lay of the Nibelungs, I was interested to hear that story reproduced in miniature here. I hadn’t realized it was part of the cycle. Also amusing to hear Thor come off so badly in several of the tales about him. I’m really glad to have finally gotten around to this one: the Prose Edda has been on my list for years.

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amazing read

amazing reading, excellent to listen too would definitely recommend to anyone interested in Norse mythology

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Well read

This is a great translation and is read very well. Best one I’ve heard thus far

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good...but.

only issue I can see is the pronunciation of aesir. I feel it should be pronounced (ay-seer) the way it sounds now sounds a lot like asses rather than aesir.

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Norse Mythology

A must book for all who love Norse Mythology
It is the main source and it is a good one.

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  • A Person
  • 09-07-21

Mostly Missing

I’m learning to read old Norse and bought this translation so i could see how well I could read the original while listening along, (having already finished my own translation as practice work).
For the most part I could always see how this translator got from the Norse text to his English equivalents, however there are some major, and I mean major problems, including entire missing sections, which should be made clear before you buy.

I don’t want to say much about the reader he’s competent but hardly sparkling, he does a good Fenrir voice though.

No Notes:
There are four main manuscripts of the prose Edda, all are slightly different and all have gaps, so some notes explaining which texts this translations is based on would be useful, however there are no notes to explain the translation at all, or which manuscripts have been used as the primary text and for ordering the content. Many of the translation decisions beg for an explanation, some of them really rather drastic, see below.

Missing Sections:
The prose Edda contains four sections, an introduction, Gylfaginnings, Skaldskapermal, and Hattatal.
1. Snorri’s Introduction is completely missing.
2. The final paragraph of Gylfaginnings is missing, (this paragraph relates Gylfaginnings back to the introduction).
3. After beginning the first chapter of Skaldskapermal the translation then skips forward all the way to chapter seventeen, (about fifteen pages in my textbook). Cutting out a lot of examples, explanations of kennings, lists of different kennings for each of the gods, and more text relevant to the Snorri’s introduction. (The translator appears to have given up tracking the chapter numbers at this point, although the chapter numbers for Skaldskapermal are a little confusing anyway.)
4. So much more of skaldskapermal is missing that it has become pointless keeping track. Most of the big chunks of mythological story are retained but almost all references to poetry and Kennings are gone, which is most of this section of the book.
5. Hattatal is completely missing

9 people found this helpful

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  • Tony Russell
  • 09-23-21

Great bit of history

lovely listen and will for many years. couldn't ask for a better read. recombination

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