• The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium

  • By: Martin Gurri
  • Narrated by: Tony Messano
  • Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (371 ratings)

1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $24.95

Buy for $24.95

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

In the words of economist and scholar Arnold Kling, Martin Gurri saw it coming.

Technology has categorically reversed the information balance of power between the public and the elites who manage the great hierarchical institutions of the industrial age government, political parties, the media.

The Revolt of the Public tells the story of how insurgencies, enabled by digital devices and a vast information sphere, have mobilized millions of ordinary people around the world.

Originally published in 2014, this updated edition of The Revolt of the Public includes an extensive analysis of Donald Trump's improbable rise to the presidency and the electoral triumphs of Brexit and concludes with a speculative look forward, pondering whether the current elite class can bring about a reformation of the democratic process and whether new organizing principles, adapted to a digital world, can arise out of the present political turbulence.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2018 Martin Gurri (P)2018 Stripe Press

What listeners say about The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    282
  • 4 Stars
    52
  • 3 Stars
    25
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    4
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    214
  • 4 Stars
    71
  • 3 Stars
    23
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    3
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    238
  • 4 Stars
    46
  • 3 Stars
    21
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    6

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

New forces break things, but can't replace them

The contest of new voices and old swirls in a stew of new complexity. Old structures of authority and legitimacy wobble. Tiny sub-tribes ("publics," here) emerge, seemingly from nowhere, temporarily and provisionally, often simply to hurl stones at the ostensible authorities, and to disband again. These centers of authority come from our recent past and are in all domains: business, bureaucracy, science.

For some, all these newly moving parts signal a need to cling ever tighter to their certitudes, their (sometimes) internally-consistent walled personal realities. On the web, one can find new comfort in far-flung kindred folks (for virtually any complex of beliefs), with a new bluster since one can bray all day and never stand face to face with opponents. These new structures are weak and provisional, mostly, and not capable of governing, says the author, speaking mostly from the vantage of 2014. But it follows from all this that some new champions would emerge and find some style under which to gather all these threads and anxieties into good old centralized political power. Enter Donald Trump. (Think: FDR or Hitler on radio in 1931.) But Trump too is just another moment in this evolution which, the author is modest enough to say, is too complex to predict. The author foresees nihilism but this is just one possible future or stage. I think it is too complex to call, to multifaceted to neatly model. For fairly recent history and its meaning (which is still plenty useful now), this book is a gem, with heaps of context for thinking about it all. The author is a fine, crisp writer and the narrator is effective.

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

myopically biased projection

If you watch and read nothing but MSNBC and CNN you might enjoy this biased take on recent political events.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Rant from crazy uncle ed

The author has some interesting insights about the role of increased information in undermining trust in authority, but he fundamentally seems to think this loss of trust is deserved. He thinks governments, for instance, promise more than they deliver, and rather than fixing the delivery, they should promise less.

This is a terribly biased analysis. Failure to deliver has many causes and only some of them are because of the impossibility of the task. One horse he beats on over and over again is the supposed failure of the 2009 economic stimulus in the United States under Obama. Contrary to his claims, most economists think the stimulus did work, but that it was about half the size it needed to be. They said this at the time it was enacted, so it’s not a revisionist interpretation of events. He draws the conclusion that Obama attempted a task that was impossible, which is absurd. The role of government spending on economic activity is well-understood; it was the politics that crippled it.

The author criticizes many of the actors in the political arena as being nihilists, but the author is just as much a nihilist as they are when he disparages the capability of governments of doing great things.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Identifies symptoms, not the problem

A better version of this book lies in Patrick Deneen's, 'Why Liberalism Failed'.

lots of good information in this book, but he fails to identify more fundamental ideas that underlie the problems of modernity.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Very Insightful and Helpful

This was an insightful book. Helps you understand how we got where we are and what might be coming in the future and why.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Days good, analysis…lopsided

This has good points and it is interesting to see the 2014 vs 2017 compare.

This comes from a conservative libertarian and anti-elite information silo and perspective. If that is your view, you will probably love it. Me, no so much.

I wouldn’t mind seeing another chapter post 2021 to see how he analyzes those events.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Enlightening

Some of the more extreme opinions about social beliefs really don’t hold water, at least with me. Many times I shook my head about Gurri’s assumptions that people have no faith in government, especially about economic matters. I understand the sentiment, but I feel, especially in todays post pandemic western economy, that the fed has done a really good job (so far). Overall a great read, and it helped me understand nihilism and the fringes a little better.

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Incredibly tedious

I can’t believe Silicon Valley people are so obsessed with this book, it’s just further proof they don’t understand anything about how government works. What a total drag.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Very interesting theory, some leaps taken

Enjoyed the premise. Thought provoking.
Definitely has examples with some leaps in logic not all supported, but still worth the read! The book offers some interesting explanations for some of the chaos we are seeing during this period of transition due to the Digital and Information Revolution.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Well throughout and thought provoking, especially with respect to our lack of introspection

A very well written and mapped out book. Martin Gurri explains in details where we are headed as a “public” or as he more accurately depicts the current public as sectarian. The book provides a good an analysis while trying to steer away from defining a policy.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Mr. Oleksiy Rashevsky
  • Mr. Oleksiy Rashevsky
  • 07-19-21

Good ideas but not so good examples

The revolution in Ukraine was presented in a way to fit the narrative of the book. There were many things which the author got right e.g. disillusioned public, role of social networks except the status quo of this country. The mafia style regime of Yanukovich was a deviation from the status quo. When the regime was overthrown the situation went back to the usual status quo which is corruption.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
Profile Image for Michael Sweeney
  • Michael Sweeney
  • 05-31-20

Excellent analysis of where we are now

This is a clearly argued view of how and why modern political activity has become so fragmented. An excellent analysis.

.