1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $9.80

Buy for $9.80

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone is vintage Tennessee Williams. It is the story of a 50-ish wealthy American widow who was most recently a famous stage beauty but is now drifting after the death of her husband. With poignant wit and his own particular brand of relish, Williams charts her drift into an affair with a cruel young gigolo.
©1950 The University of the South (P)2009 Audio Holdings, LLC

Critic Reviews

"Splendid characterization." ( Library Journal)

What listeners say about The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    23
  • 4 Stars
    7
  • 3 Stars
    4
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    18
  • 4 Stars
    10
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    18
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Classic Tennessee Williams

Having just recently watched the movie with Helen Mirren as Mrs. Stone, it dawned on me I should actually Tuesday some works by the author, rather than just watch movie renditions.

So cheated “read’ with “listen” and, as luck would have it, this was the only of his books I found on Audible.

Still going backwards, the movie was quite faithful to the book, with the exceptions not affecting the story at all.

Mr. Williams has a wonderfully insightful way of presenting all the contextual how’s, why’s and wherefores of a situation before zooming in on The. Point., often presenting deadpan humor in all seriousness.

Embedded in his technique is (here) the tale of a woman of a certain age and independent means struggling to rebuild a significant life after the pillars of significance in her now-former life had fallen.

Not an easy task in post-war Rome, trying to navigate the gold diggers of several ages and fallen - as well as contrived - social classes.

Though the story holds up well all these decades later, the raciness of it has lost its piquancy compared to what 2022 culture is casually exposed to.