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Publisher's Summary

Practical, real-life methods for becoming the luckiest person you know - with no lucky charms or rituals needed.

Luck: We're not sure what it is, but we know we want it on our side. Is luck a cosmic force that we can randomly stumble upon, or is there something real that people who we consider lucky have discovered? The Science of Being Lucky is an in-depth look at what all lucky people have in common and how they set themselves up for success time after time.

Put success into your own hands, not fate's. The Science of Being Lucky takes you on a science-based journey into what luck is, what we think it is, and how to get more of it in your life. The journey begins by breaking down and defining the lucky breaks, coincidences, and serendipitous events in our lives, then delves into the specific traits, life factors, and perspectives that create lucky outcomes. The Science of Being Lucky will open your eyes to what is behind each moment you would call lucky and give you a concrete action plan to create more of the same.

Luck doesn't have to be just fantasy. Become immune to bad luck. Peter Hollins has studied psychology and peak human performance for over a dozen years and is a best-selling author. He has worked with dozens of individuals to unlock their potential and put them on the path to success. His writing draws on his academic, coaching, and research experience. He's no stranger to bad luck, having broken the same toe three times, but he's found ways to reverse his luck and live the good life. Ditch the lucky underwear and rabbit's foot.

©2017 Peter Hollins (P)2017 Peter Hollins

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great synopsis on the law of large numbers

great perspective as well. i have read a few of peter s books. what i like about his style is the concise format, not too much info, but not too little either..great stand alone, or if you wish, an introduction for a much deeper and involved study..i. read alot so i enjoy the various perspectives on any one subject..over all, very well organized and written, kept my interest...i have read this book 3 times..i will read more books by the same author...the narrator did a good job as well..easy to listen to his voice, clear, good reading speed and life like, not robotic..

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good book but,

the book is good especially the start but as is with most of these books there's bias within, mainly in generalizations, if you are a successful person you already likely know that everyone is everything(in terms of personality and behavior) in different circumstances, so to pigeon hole someone as neurotic or open as is done with personality assessments you've only really identified that person's personality in that instance. of course those who maintain certain types of behavior more frequently can be assumed to be a certain way but the very language around these concepts is the biggest issue in the field of study of psychology. People can be static but many are not and you can be the best of all worlds by understanding when to use what types of mindsets, this book treated personalities and their respective traits as concrete. this is useful for learning information but fails to realize that you can be a magical thinker in a disaster and a logical one in your day to day. perhaps that was not the authors intention but it reads as though people cannot be both types of people dependent on context. that's self limiting to believe which is why I point it out.

otherwise a fantastic book full of alot of useful information! I definitely do and have recommended it but I caution anyone into firmly believing that you can't be the best of all traits simply by recognizing when and where they are beneficial. to some degree that's the purpose of this book showing people how to make 'luck' but it reads particularly in the second half to pigeon hole people which is does gold merit because there are plenty of people who remain static in life but there's a good chunk of people who will exhibit certain traits in specific contexts and not in others, that's the key to further maximizing your potential know when and where to apply what type of mind set. with that bit of info you can only derive benefit from this book it's just important to keep that in mind so you can use the draw backs to identify where to eliminate certain mind sets and the benefits as areas to maintain those lines of thinking.

over all 4.5/5

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Not Quite a Science

Being Lucky is not a siciene--the book proves is many things we attribute to luck have a firm grounding in how a person approaches life. This is a good book to read if you think you've lost your way.