• The Series

  • What I Remember, What It Felt Like, What It Feels Like Now
  • By: Ken Dryden
  • Narrated by: Ken Dryden
  • Length: 2 hrs and 8 mins
  • 4.4 out of 5 stars (9 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

A new book by Hall of Fame goalie and bestselling author Ken Dryden celebrates the 50th anniversary of the 1972 Summit Series

 SEPTEMBER 2, 1972, MONTREAL FORUM, GAME ONE: 

The best against the best for the first time. Canada, the country that had created the game; the Soviet Union, having taken it up only twenty-six years earlier. On the line: more than the players, more than the fans, more than Canadians and Russians knew.

So began an entirely improbable, near-month-long series of games that became more and more riveting, until, for the eighth, and final, and deciding game - on a weekday, during work and school hours all across the country - the nation stopped. Of Canada’s 22 million people, 16 million watched. Three thousand more were there, in Moscow, behind the Iron Curtain, singing - Da da, Ka-na-da, nyet, nyet, So-vi-yet!

It is a story long told, often told. But never like this.

Ken Dryden, a goalie in the series, a lifetime observer, later a writer, tells the story in “you are there” style, as if he is living it for the first time. As if you, the listener, are too.

The series, as it turned out, is the most important moment in hockey history, changing the game, on the ice and off, everywhere in the world. As it turned out, it is one of the most significant events in all of Canada’s history.

Through Ken Dryden’s words, we understand why.

©2022 Ken Dryden (P)2022 Penguin Random House Canada
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

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None better than Dryden

Ken Dryden’s hockey writing is a true gift to fans, and this short, but impactful account of the 1972 series, albeit through a foggy lens of 50 years, is no exception. Give it a listen.

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Fantastic, just wish it was longer

Mr. Dryden is a wonderful storyteller. I just wish this was longer. Fantastic stuff, any hockey fan needs to hear it.

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Great Recollections!!

What a wonderful story!!
I remember watching this series as it unfolded. The Canadians vs. The Soviets. Dryden recaptured the period of the middle of the Cold War. Although, I am an American hockey fan, I rooted hard for Canada. The players were familiar to me from the NHL.
We thought the Canadians would steamroll over the players from behind the Iron Curtain. The Canadian team, every one an NHL star, was certainly the best in the world and would put away the Russians. But, we were shocked!! The Russians were not just good, they were great! We needed an absolute perfect games to win.
In the end of the grueling 8 game series we learned a lot about the game, ourselves and how our world needed change.
Ken Dryden really does a terrific job in capturing those emotions.