• The Spanish Flu 1918 History of the Deadliest

  • Lessons to Learn and Global Consequences. Comparison with the Pandemic of 2020 and How to Prevent New Ones in the Future
  • By: Mariah Khan
  • Narrated by: Peter Seymour
  • Length: 5 hrs and 8 mins
  • 2.4 out of 5 stars
    5

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Publisher's Summary

Did you know? 

During the flu pandemic of 1918, the New York City health commissioner tried to slow the transmission of the flu by ordering businesses to open and close on staggered shifts to avoid overcrowding on the subways.

The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, the deadliest in history, infected an estimated 500 million people worldwide - about one-third of the planet’s population - and killed an estimated 20 million to 50 million victims, including some 675,000 Americans. The 1918 flu was first observed in Europe, the United States and parts of Asia before swiftly spreading around the world.

It is dangerous to draw too many parallels between Coronavirus and the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, that killed at least 50 million people around the world.

Covid-19 is an entirely new disease, which disproportionately affects older people. The deadly strain of influenza that swept the globe in 1918 tended to strike those aged between 20 and 30, with strong immune systems.

But the actions taken by governments and individuals to prevent the spread of infection have a familiar ring to them.

The first wave of the 1918 pandemic occurred in the spring and was generally mild. The sick, who experienced such typical flu symptoms as chills, fever and fatigue, usually recovered after several days, and the number of reported deaths was low.

However, a second, highly contagious wave of influenza appeared with a vengeance in the fall of that same year. Victims died within hours or days of developing symptoms, their skin turning blue and their lungs filling with fluid that caused them to suffocate. In just one year, 1918, the average life expectancy in America plummeted by a dozen years.

Where did the spanish flu come from?

Scientists still do not know for sure where the Spanish Flu originated, though theories point to France, China, Britain, or the United States, where the first known case was reported at Camp Funston in Fort Riley, Kansas, on March 11, 1918.

©2020 Mariah Khan (P)2020 Mariah Khan
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

What listeners say about The Spanish Flu 1918 History of the Deadliest

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

informative, repetitive, echo

The narrative was informative. But the book overall seemed like a compilation of dozens I've short manuscripts. The author repeated the reason for the name Spanish flu no fewer than 25 times. this was the case for many of the facts highlighted in the book.

most of the repetitive narrative was consistent, but a few times it wasn't. for example the number of affected by the flu varied as much as 250%, depending on chapter.

the audio quality and the spoken word was terrible. the sound quality was as if the reader did the entire dialogue from a public bathroom stall. There was a significant echo, that often sounded like the reader was speaking into a glass jar.

the reader mispronounced words, but to his credit repeated the sentence correctly pronouncing the word. I've never heard an audio book where the reader makes errors and corrects them in the recorded material.

overall I did learn from this audiobook. The repetitiveness of the commentary actually helped drill some of the facts into my head.

and I appreciate the author pursuing an audio release of a low budget buck quickly, especially since we're in the midst of a global pandemic in September 2020.

1 person found this helpful

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    1 out of 5 stars
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Reverb

Evidently it was recorded in a bathroom. Re verb er a ration! Was not able to listen to it.

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i want a refund! Very difficult to understand.

Bad enough with a difficult accent, but a background audio of hypnotic brainwashing violin crying!