• The Twilight of Pluto

  • Astrology and the Rise and Fall of Planetary Influences
  • By: John Michael Greer
  • Narrated by: Ross Douglas
  • Length: 5 hrs and 46 mins
  • 4.7 out of 5 stars (7 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

• Explains in detail how the demotion or proved nonexistence of a planet marks the beginning of a roughly 30-year period in which that planet’s influence wanes 

• Explores Pluto’s arc of influence on individual and collective life in depth, from its discovery in 1930 to the end of its influence in 2036 

• Offers examples from other demoted planets, such as Ceres, whose 50-year reign as a planet corresponds very closely to the Romantic Era of history 

Recent research in astrology has shown that the discovery of a new planet correlates with the emergence of a new set of influences in individual and collective life. As John Michael Greer reveals, the opposite is also true: The demotion of a planet correlates with the decline of a set of influences into the background.

Exploring the waxing and waning of planetary influences in astrology, Greer explains in detail how the demotion or proved nonexistence of a planet marks the beginning of a roughly 30-year period in which that planet’s influence fades out. He examines several examples of planet demotion, including Ceres, whose influence began to take shape some 30 years before its discovery in 1801 and gradually faded over the three decades following its demotion in the 1850s. 

Examining Pluto’s astrological influence in depth, from the beginning of the search for “Planet X” in 1900 to the end of its influence in 2036, the author shows how during the Plutonian era the concept of cosmos - from the ancient Greek meaning “that which is beautifully ordered” - was in eclipse. Pluto’s influence led to the rejection of unity, beauty, and order, exemplified through the splitting of the atom by physicists, the splitting of the individual into conscious and subconscious halves by psychoanalysts, and the splitting of the world into warring camps by politicians. 

Offering an essential guide not only to the astrology of the future but also to the twilight of the Plutonian era, Greer shows how as Pluto’s influence fades out in the years ahead, a great many disruptive phenomena of the recent past will fade with it.

©2022 John Michael Greer. All Rights Reserved. (P)2022 Inner Traditions Audio. All Rights Reserved.

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Never Thought Of It That Way

This book is fascinating. If nothing else, it’s a clearly-written, clearly-read articulation of a pro-astrology worldview.

Greer makes the case for periods in history correlating with what planets are in the public mind, starting thirty years before discovery, and, if the discovery was a mistake, ending thirty years after demotion. He tracks this through each of the planets, as well as examining heavenly also-rans such as Vulcan and Lilith, and the demoted Ceres.

There is a pro-forma nod to reasonability in mentioning the positive sides to the Era of Pluto. My response is, “eh, [expletive] Pluto.”

People on the fence about getting this book should check out a kind of blog-miniseries that Greer did a while back, called The Well Of Galabes, where he discussed various occult topics, astrology included. As someone who believed occultism was for airheads and teenage girls, it was eye-opening.

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  • Carly
  • 04-25-22

interesting perspective

Loved the collection of information surrounding Pluto. Would recommed to anyone interested in astrology and its history