• The Women's March

  • A Novel of the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession
  • By: Jennifer Chiaverini
  • Narrated by: Saskia Maarleveld
  • Length: 10 hrs and 51 mins
  • 4.3 out of 5 stars (115 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

New York Times best-selling author Jennifer Chiaverini returns with The Women’s March, an enthralling historical novel of the woman’s suffrage movement inspired by three courageous women who bravely risked their lives and liberty in the fight to win the vote.

Twenty-five-year-old Alice Paul returns to her native New Jersey after several years on the front lines of the suffrage movement in Great Britain. Weakened from imprisonment and hunger strikes, she is nevertheless determined to invigorate the stagnant suffrage movement in her homeland. Nine states have already granted women voting rights, but only a constitutional amendment will secure the vote for all.

To inspire support for the campaign, Alice organizes a magnificent procession down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC, the day before the inauguration of President-Elect Woodrow Wilson, a firm antisuffragist.

Joining the march is 39-year-old New Yorker Maud Malone, librarian and advocate for women’s and workers’ rights. The daughter of Irish immigrants, Maud has acquired a reputation - and a criminal record - for interrupting politicians’ speeches with pointed questions they’d rather ignore.

Civil rights activist and journalist Ida B. Wells-Barnett resolves that women of color must also be included in the march - and the proposed amendment. Born into slavery in Mississippi, Ida worries that White suffragists may exclude Black women if it serves their own interests.

On March 3, 1913, the glorious march commences, but negligent police allow vast crowds of belligerent men to block the parade route - jeering, shouting threats, assaulting the marchers - endangering not only the success of the demonstration but the women’s very lives.

Inspired by actual events, The Women’s March offers a fascinating account of a crucial but little-remembered moment in American history, a turning point in the struggle for women’s rights. 

©2021 Jennifer Chiaverini (P)2021 HarperCollins Publishers

What listeners say about The Women's March

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  • Overall
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Inspiring------and heart breaking.

Great true story, minimal literary license was taken. It was the character and historical figure Ida B. Wells who was the most interesting and moving to me. I was familiar with her history, as with most of the historical women who who fought so hard for our rights, but Maude Malone was new to me. We owe so much to our Sufferagist foremothers. As a progressive activist nowadays, the close alliances as well as the disagreements are familiar to me. The racist idiocy of even trying to keep Black women, including Ida B. Wells (!) from marching, makes me grind my teeth in anger and disgust. We still are dealing with class and racial misunderstandings and subsequent lack of coherence. Currently we face voter suppression attempts to disenfranchise most of the same people who had to go through so much to be allowed to vote! I found the book inspiring because of that, and heartbreaking, because it is looking as though we will have to do it all over again. VOTE everyone! Our democracy cannot exist if we let the same old vote suppressors take over again.

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Boring

I’ve been trying to like this-Ive enjoyed some of this authors books. But it’s too detailed and the characters and situations are boring.

2 people found this helpful

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Tedious

I wanted to love this book, but I did not. I actually found it to be somewhat tedious. I was not invested in the characters.

1 person found this helpful

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women's right to vote

excellent novel blending true history with a little fiction to make a memorable story. Thanks

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We need to continue to understand our history.

We must keep the stories alive of how difficult the fight to gain freedom is. Fictionized stories like this one help to decrease a textbook delivery of facts. So, I appreciate Jennifer Chiaverini's research and finished work. Here's to strong women.

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Why wasn't this taught in history classes?

This is history, well researched and come alive. Why wasn't this taught in history classes? I love history and I don't ever recall learning of the things that are read about in this book.

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A disappointing history lesson/lecture

This is not a novel. I kept waiting for there to be a story, four characters to be described, relationships to be built. It didn’t happen. This was just simply a disjointed history lesson, maybe because there were so many people that the author was trying to discuss. But this was not at all this authors usual, careful, integrated work. Really not worth the read. You could have found this information in a Wikipedia link, with as little dialogue or development as occurred in this disjointed, wondering bit of English language. Don’t bother, I am so disappointed. I especially didn’t appreciate being lectured on certain topics that we already have some understanding about and appreciation for. Don’t need that kind of author attitude.

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True Story Written Well

As the granddaughter of a suffragette, I know a lot of the history behind the 19th amendment. A lot of books based on historical events read very dry. This was written in such a way you felt like you were going along with the characters as these things occurred. Thee writing was great and the narration was superb. if you are interested in women's rights you need to read this story.

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Another gold one

Everything Jennifer writes is worth the read (or listen). I want my daughters son in laws and grandchildren to listen to this . We need to be reminded and taught of the things that did not come easy or without a price that we so casually enjoy today. The performance was fantastic. Thank you both.

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I learned a lot

The characters are real and their struggles and determination to overcome obstacles are incredible and inspiring.