• This Is Where You Belong

  • The Art and Science of Loving the Place You Live
  • By: Melody Warnick
  • Narrated by: Carrington MacDuffie
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • 4.1 out of 5 stars (245 ratings)

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This Is Where You Belong  By  cover art

This Is Where You Belong

By: Melody Warnick
Narrated by: Carrington MacDuffie
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Publisher's Summary

In the spirit of Gretchen Rubin's The Happiness Project and Eric Weiner's The Geography of Bliss, a journalist embarks on a project to discover what it takes to love where you live.

The average restless American will move 11.7 times in a lifetime. For Melody Warnick, it was her sixth move - from Austin, Texas, to Blacksburg, Virginia - that threatened to unhinge her. In the lonely aftermath of unpacking, she wondered: Aren't we supposed to put down roots at some point? How does the place we live become the place we want to stay? This time she had an epiphany. Rather than hold her breath and hope this new town would be her family's perfect fit, she would figure out how to fall in love with it - no matter what.

How we come to feel at home in our towns and cities is what Warnick sets out to discover in This Is Where You Belong. She dives into the body of research around place attachment - the deep sense of connection that binds some of us to our cities and increases our physical and emotional well-being - then travels to towns across America to see it in action. Inspired by a growing movement of placemaking, she examines what its practitioners are doing to create likable locales. She also speaks with frequent movers and loyal stayers around the country to learn what draws highly mobile Americans to a new city and what makes us stay. The best ideas she imports to her adopted hometown of Blacksburg for a series of "Love Where You Live" experiments designed to make her feel more locally connected: dining with her neighbors, shopping Small Business Saturday, marching in the town Christmas parade.

Can these efforts make a halfhearted resident happier? Will Blacksburg be the place she finally stays? What Warnick learns will inspire you to embrace your own community - and perhaps discover that the place where you live right now...is home.

©2016 Melody Warnick (P)2016 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about This Is Where You Belong

Average Customer Ratings
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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Look beyond yourself!

Great book for those who have a hard time feeling like they fit into a community. I took away some tangible goals to help get plugged in to my neighborhood/town. Overall, I think this is a book that is aimed to challenge you to think beyond your own world and care deeper about those around you.

6 people found this helpful

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Perfect book for frequent movers

The author provides great ideas/suggestions on how to make the most of where you live right now through live where you live mini experiments and suggestions for meeting neighbors. As a Military Spouse of fifteen years and living in our first bought home, this book was easily relatable and convinced me to do more in and for our community.

5 people found this helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
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Common sense & a waste of time!

Wow, ok, so if you’re not a millennial saddled with student debt, strategically choosing where you live based off of walkability and public transport because you don’t own a car and actually like socializing with other human beings, than maybe this book can be helpful. I’ve heard from snobby rich expats who don’t do their own grocery shopping and never walk or take public transit or speak to any locals that this book was so surprising! The narration is also terrible. Bad, bad, unnatural pacing.

2 people found this helpful

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Lots of engaging and actionable ways to love the place you live... with some REALLY annoying narration quirks

I am planning to do so many of the things that Warnick attempted in her “love where you live” experiment. Honestly, I feel like I love the place I live more just by thinking about the possibilities.

BUT the narration is super annoying. I was areadu not a huge fan of the narrator’s delivery, but there are a lot of plain old mistakes here. How would you pronounce the year “2007”? MacDuffie says “twenty-o-seven” EVERY TIME. With as much research as there is in this book, there are a lot of dates and this gets old real fast. She also randomly mispronounces a lot of words like “Herculean.” The book was not changed at all to make it make sense for audiobook (there are times when she’ll say a town name, then “pronounced <repeat town name>”—we know, you just said it). Plus, the editing is just no good, there are phrases/sentences that are repeated twice. I could go on. Usually, I don’t give the narrator grief for stuff like this, but it needlessly marred the listening experience. I would still buy this audiobook again and would recommend it, but just be aware that this stuff can drive you crazy.

2 people found this helpful

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  • :)
  • 04-12-22

First few chapters are ok then it goes down hill fast.

This really gets annoying midway through. The first few chapters seem to be what the book claimed to be about but the rest of it is nothing more than the author’s story of her town in Blacksburg, Virginia and how she forced herself to like it better by getting involved and volunteering. The narrator’s voice started grating on my nerves about one third of the way through. Basically its a book about making your town better by volunteerism and supporting local businesses. The points could have been made in a short article instead of long drawn out chapters that are neither inspiring or interesting. Boring.

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Abundant privilege

Some suggestions were okay, but obvious. Most of the other suggestions were about donating money and choosing not to volunteer at places where there are hungry people, as well as an explicit explanation on how gentrification works with slightly racist undertones. No thanks.

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My RX book for living in a town I do not like

I have lived in quite a few places that I liked. Currently, I live in a town I do not particularly care for. I intentionally listen to this book see if I might be able to glean insights so that I may possibly like this current town more than I do now, which is not much at all.

There are definitely a few good points that I will consider.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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À thoughtful book

This is a thoughtful book with a solid reader’s performance. I like it well enough.

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Great book for planners and elected officials.

This book goes into the citizens perspective on what they need to do to connect to place. However, planners and elected officials need to provide the opportunity for folks to get involved and become passionate about the places they call home.

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Interesting

Interesting book with author sharing her own personal journey and that of others as well as research findings.