• Three Daughters of Eve

  • By: Elif Shafak
  • Narrated by: Alix Dunmore
  • Length: 10 hrs and 56 mins
  • 4.4 out of 5 stars (198 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Set across Istanbul and Oxford, from the 1980s to the present day, Three Daughters of Eve is a sweeping tale of faith and friendship, tradition and modernity, love and an unexpected betrayal.

Peri, a wealthy Turkish housewife and mother, is on her way to a dinner party at a seaside mansion in Istanbul when a beggar snatches her handbag. As she wrestles to get it back, a photograph falls to the ground - an old polaroid of three young women and their university professor. A relic from a past - and a love Peri had tried desperately to forget.

The photograph takes Peri back to Oxford University, as a 19-year-old sent abroad for the first time. To her dazzling, rebellious Professor and his life-changing course on God. To the house she shares with her two best friends, Shirin and Mona, and their arguments about identity, Islam and feminism. And finally, to the scandal that tore them all apart.

Shirin, Peri and Mona, they were the most unlikely of friends. They were the Sinner, the Believer and the Confused.

©2017 Elif Shafak (P)2018 Audible, Ltd

What listeners say about Three Daughters of Eve

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • CA
  • 04-28-18

Review 3 daughters of Eve

I am a fan of Elif Safak in general, her writing style, the way she approaches to narrate the stories in her novels. The storyline in this novel did not talk to me much. Furthermore, the narrator’s attempt switching to “turkish” accent did take away from the novel and listening experience for me. I would rather her speak without the accent.

3 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

mediocre book.

good build up with a mediocre ending. overall, it is ok, but not the best from elif

1 person found this helpful

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Trademark dynamic writing style

Excellently narrated. A compelling protagonist that explores themes of faith and doubt in a richly nuanced manner. Top 3 favorites of Shafak's body of work.

1 person found this helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

A good story belabored by philosophical debate

The story comes together nicely. The character development and timeline jumps work well. What I struggled with was the tendency to delve deeply into philosophical debate about god and religion. This is not to say the book doesn’t raise some excellent points and shine light on some important topics. It was just that those parts of the narrative weee a bit sluggish to get through. Oh, and I HATED the ending. Seriously.

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Inscrutable

This is my first review. I admit I pay careful attentions to reviews before purchasing.
I read a great deal. I have absolutely no idea what this book was about. I enjoyed some of the chapters individually and the narration was excellent. But it simply was not a story that made sense to me.

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Interesting, well told story.

Ending is disappointing, but perhaps hopeful. This story has many characters interacting through varied eras, which can make it a little hard to follow at times, so read this book when you have time to concentrate on it, not when you are doing many other things. But I really enjoyed getting to know this story. This is the 2nd book I have finished by this author and plan to pick up more.

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Love her words

It’s never in the story with this author as they say it’s the journey that matters.

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Loved it

Great delivery but a bit of a weak ending. Could be a part 2
They should be made into films. I would love to see some Turkish movies again.

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Promising story, disappointing execution

The author seems to be fulfilling an egocentric need to praise her character. The two characters Mona and Shirin lack depth and are no more than stereotypes. She also fails to understand the cultural background of the counties she keeps referring to in her book. One of the characters is from Iran, where religion is not the main source, and at times is not reconciled in the cultural identity of the country. In Iran, what people reminisce about ir participate in is not about religious holidays but those of Norouz and Yalda, and people have a direct sense of spirituality derived form Sufism. It also fails to understand the historical background in ways other than those of religion, failing to take into account contemporary history, from Reza Shah to the theocratic nature of the place where Shirin comes from. In a sense, this theocracy has robbed Shirin of her home. This is particularly in contrast to that of Turkey, where Islam and caliphate played an important part of national identity in the Ottoman Empire. Overall, the two characters Mona and Shirin are stereotypical and one-dimensional, and lack depth, but the author ambitiously uses them as opposite poles without being able to cover these characters more comprehensively.

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    4 out of 5 stars

Beautiful, compelling, timely

Elif Shafak’s writing is evocative, personal, and universally human. I will listen to this story again. Infused throughout the compelling story are moments to remember, phrases to contemplate. And Alix Dunmore’s narration is so good, I look for books she narrates. Often narrators gum up a story with too much imposed feeling. Ms Dunmore lets the story reveal itself freely and truly.