• Unoffendable

  • How Just One Change Can Make All of Life Better
  • By: Brant Hansen
  • Narrated by: Brant Hansen
  • Length: 4 hrs and 21 mins
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (2,222 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

It's a radical, provocative idea: We're not entitled to get offended or stay angry. The idea of our own "righteous anger" is a myth. It is the number-one problem in our societies today and, as Dallas Willard says, Christians have not been taught out of it.

As it turns out, giving up our "right" to be offended can be one of the most freeing, healthy, simplifying, relaxing, refreshing, stress-relieving, encouraging things we can do. In Unoffendable, listeners will find something of immeasurable value - a concrete, practical way to live life with less stress. They'll adjust their expectations to fit human nature and replace perpetual anger with refreshing humility and gratitude.

Through the author's winsome, humorous, and conversational style, this book doesn't add another thing to do on a stressed-out person's ever-growing list. Unoffendable actually seeks to lift religious burdens from our backs and allow us to experience the joy of gratitude, perhaps for the first time, every single day of our lives.

©2015 Brant Hansen (P)2015 Tantor

Critic Reviews

"[A] charming handbook for the contemporary Christian that will also find its audience among pastors." ( Library Journal)

What listeners say about Unoffendable

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Truth. How refreshing.

Thank you, Brant. You nailed it. Suffered some conviction. Cried a strange mix of happy-sad tears. But mostly smiled & laughed... a lot. God is so good and His truth is so liberating.

"As a result, we are no longer to be children, tossed here and there by waves and carried about by every wind of doctrine, by the trickery of men, by craftiness in deceitful scheming; but speaking the truth in love, we are to grow up in all aspects into Him who is the head, even Christ, from whom the whole body, being fitted and held together by what every joint supplies, according to the proper working of each individual part, causes the growth of the body for the building up of itself in love."
- Ephesians 4:14-16 (NASB)

8 people found this helpful

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A defense for offense

I think Brant has good intentions here, but it seems to me he missed the mark with "Unoffendable," for several reasons.

First, Brant doesn't offer very much guidance to Christians who've tried being unoffendable already, and haven't met with the same success he obviously has.

Second, he doesn't really explain what we should do with offense except that it shouldn't be happening to us. The impression one gets from Brant's message in Unoffendable is that it may be wrong to even feel offended about anything AT ALL, but if you do chance to feel offended, there's nothing to do about that feeling except denigrate it immediately, and with the most thorough enthusiasm.

Lastly, Brant doesn't seem to answer some of the most basic, fundamental questions about the very topic he's chosen to address. Here are just a few of the questions I think other readers would appreciate him attacking.

1. If offense doesn't have a constructive purpose for our lives, then why does it seem so programmed in to our very nature to be offended at what we find reprehensible, and to approve what we don't find reprehensible?

2. Brant says that Jesus hasn't given us the right to be offended. If this is true, then are we in sin when we are offended? Should we confess the fact of being offended in our prayers?

3. Why don't monkeys, or other animals get offended when they throw their own poop at each other? What would animal life be like if they did get by certain things, and were not offended by others? Is it possible that offense serves as a first defense against the devaluation of values, and regression into animalistic tendencies? (It seems to me this is probably the case.)

4. Can anything go wrong by not being offended by something you should be offended by?

It seems to me there is a proper moral middle ground between those people who are quick to become offended by every little thing that violates one of their sensibilities, and those people who are so little offended by participating in any form of degradation, you wonder if they have any sense of pride at all. Neither attitude adjusts properly to the conditions of reality and experience.

In summary, it's not that I don't appreciate what Brant is trying to convey, that we do well to practice patience toward others whose opinions, actions, and attitudes differ from our own. I apprehend, however, that this is not adequately conveyed in Hansen's book. There is no small amount of ambiguity, and a great deal too little clarity, for the topic he's trying to approach, which is a moral and philosophical topic, and cannot rightfully be separated from its true base in that science.

If you're reading reviews of Brant's book because you're looking for a better way to approach people of different beliefs from your own, I recommend philosopher John Locke's "Letter Concerning Toleration," or economist Adam Smith's "Theory of Moral Sentiments." The former explains how a Christian ought to, and should, tolerate beliefs which are different from their own, and the latter explains the social and moral purpose which moral sentiments serve in society. I've found these two books extremely helpful in answering the very same questions which, I think, Brant Hansen is trying to answer in Unoffended.

It seems prudent that if I'm going to close my review with an endorsement for another book(s), I ought to at least give some sense of those other books to my readers, which here I do, with two quotes:

"The all-wise Author of Nature has, taught man to respect the sentiments and judgments of his brethren; to be more or less pleased when they approve of his conduct, and to be more or less hurt [displeased] when they disapprove of it."
― Adam Smith, The Theory of Moral Sentiments

"For it will be very difficult to persuade men of sense that he who with dry eyes and satisfaction of mind can deliver his brother [of another religion] to the executioner to be burnt alive, does sincerely and heartily concern himself to save that brother from the flames of hell in the world to come.”
― John Locke, A Letter Concerning Toleration

8 people found this helpful

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Witty and challenging

As a person who gave their life to Jesus at a young age and in ministry for 20 years, I was challenged and humbled as I listened to Unoffendable. The gospel came to life, with the fresh reminder that my standing with God has nothing to do with me, and everything to do with Jesus. Through vivid illustrations and humorous whit Hanson reminds us that the gospel helps us see people as God sees them and frees us from the need to judge! A must read for anyone who wants to grow in loving others and living with freedom and joy.

13 people found this helpful

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Fantastic Listen and Personally Challenging

I tend toward books narrated by the author as they alone know how to emphasize and pace their reading of their own writing.

Since Brant is a radio personality, his voice and style is well developed and suited for audio books.

The book continues to present me with personal challenges long after having finished it.
On many parts, I rewound to relisten as he was going too deep into my spirit for a casual listen.

4 people found this helpful

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very inspirational

I loved listening to this book. it has just the right amount of humor mixed in with inspirational quotes and scripture. I will definitely be reading or listening to this book again!

8 people found this helpful

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Worth a read

Whilst I really enjoyed the book and got some great insights, I found it overly anecdotal.

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I needed this book. Thank you!

I am so thankful for this material. The way that Brant Hansen presents his work is so disarming...yet convicting. His candor and openness is refreshing. I am going to listen to this book repeatedly...so I get this in my heart... ot just my mind.

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life altering

Brant has packed this book with an honest life changing truth... stop being so offendable.

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I really enjoyed this book

Love and grace are the beautiful gifts that have been given to me by our dear Lord, in His goodness He is transforming me to be like Himself, so that I finally have something good to give. My judgemental and angry thoughts never helped anyone, His kindness melts the ugliest heart, I know, I had one.

2 people found this helpful

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God decent things to learn here

“Unoffendable” is both written and narrated by Brant Hansen, the audiobook is published by Tantor Audio studios for the Audible edition. The book is written from a Christian conversational perspective, it is as if the author were speaking directly to the reader who are both sitting in the same room. The author’s experience and background comes mainly from his involvement in Christian radio, speaking engagements, and writing; only this one book is available in audiobook format. It is clear his writing style has the same wit, humor, and comical tones one expects from a radio personality or one that often speaks to large crowds, it is light hearted and rather easy to digest. The author provides some good ideas and recommendation which I believe nearly anyone can learn and put into practice. I enjoyed the writing style along with his ability to additionally pull off the book’s narration rather well. I know the author is not easily offended if he practices what he wrote in this book, and with that said, let me say I felt his premise of one being unoffendable is flawed when one understands who offense is directed at.

I found his use of more modern Bible translations for the book’s scripture references an interesting choice when there are many more widely acceptable and traditional editions available. After the first two chapters, the scripture references (where they were taken from) for the audiobook were no longer provided; maybe this is included in the physical and digital editions. Multiple times he states that understanding scriptural context is important, and I would agree, however there seemed a few places where the author did more proof-texting tank focused on context. I sensed his definition of the word “offense” was more generalized and lacked a few situations that I believe should bring offense to a believer. First, let me say that one should never be offended by something directed at you individually or even as a group. Understanding one importance in the greater plans of a sovereign God, how could or should any Christian be offended by what others say about them. I agree with this part of the author’s premise and I believe he did a good job of proving it throughout the book. This is the takeaway that I think people can and should learn.

Let me briefly state where the author’s premise breaks down; and this does not negate the rest of what one learns. A Christian should be offended when others direct their offense towards a just and holy God. Christians are ambassadors of the King and would/should never permit one to speak poorly of the king. We find many Biblical example where the religious community is called dogs because of their teaching and burdening people with laws and moral; or external (perceived) righteousness. We see this when false teachers and preachers bring “a different gospel” message confusing people in the churches, Paul did not just accept it, instead he acted and addressed it. We have examples of what at times the author calls “righteous anger”, but fails to full define his term here. The Bible does not say that we are to be pacifists like the old bumper sticker “Let Go, Let God”. Should a Christian not be offended when some blasphemes God, Christ, or the Spirit? I think all the puritans and others would have been shocked and acted upon such an offense directed at God. Can God address it and not require us to take any action, sure he is God. Can we permit such to continuously happen without being offended, I do not think so. If one is unoffendable by anything, where is the love we show others by coming along side someone to point out their offense toward God through their sin. Can we be righteously angry when someone directs offense towards us, no but we often are. Can we be righteously angry when someone directs their offense towards God, yes we can.

The narration of the book was done very well for a rather short book of slightly over four hours. Brant Hansen seemed comfortable with his material; no surprise as he was also the book’s author. However, in most cases it is rare to have the author be the narrator and both be done well. There were no issues with the audio itself, no pops, clicks, or other background noise that took away from my listening. The audiobook’s recoding was professionally done.

So, you may be asking yourself after reading this review, should I get the book and have a listen? The book has a lot that one can learn if you can get past a few of the issues I pointed out above. If the use of newer translations, some slight proof-texting, and his weaker definition of how we are to address offenses towards God, you may really enjoy the book and I would recommend picking it up for a quick read or listen.

2 people found this helpful