• Waging a Good War

  • A Military History of the Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1968
  • By: Thomas E. Ricks
  • Narrated by: JD Jackson
  • Length: 14 hrs and 9 mins
  • 4.8 out of 5 stars (28 ratings)

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Waging a Good War

By: Thomas E. Ricks
Narrated by: JD Jackson
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Publisher's Summary

This program is read by multiple-award-winning narrator JD Jackson.

#1 New York Times bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner Thomas E. Ricks offers a new take on the Civil Rights Movement, stressing its unexpected use of military strategy and its lessons for nonviolent resistance around the world.

In Waging a Good War, bestselling author Thomas E. Ricks offers a fresh perspective on America’s greatest moral revolution—the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s—and its legacy today. While the Movement has become synonymous with Martin Luther King Jr.’s ethos of nonviolence, Ricks, a Pulitzer Prize-winning war reporter, draws on his deep knowledge of tactics and strategy to note the surprising affinities between that ethos and the organized pursuit of success at war. The greatest victories for Black Americans of the past century, he stresses, were won not by idealism alone, but by paying attention to recruiting, training, discipline, and organization—the hallmarks of any successful military campaign.

An engaging storyteller, Ricks deftly narrates the movement’s triumphs and defeats. He follows King and other key figures from Montgomery to Memphis, demonstrating that Gandhian nonviolence was a philosophy of active, not passive, resistance–involving the bold and sustained confrontation of the Movement’s adversaries, both on the ground and in the court of public opinion. While bringing legends such as Fannie Lou Hamer and John Lewis into new focus, Ricks also highlights lesser-known figures who played critical roles in fashioning nonviolence into an effective tool—the activists James Lawson, James Bevel, Diane Nash, and Septima Clark foremost among them. He also offers a new understanding of the Movement’s later difficulties as internal disputes and white backlash intensified. Rich with fresh interpretations of familiar events and overlooked aspects of America’s civil rights struggle, Waging a Good War is an indispensable addition to the literature of racial justice and social change—and one that offers vital lessons for our own time.

©2022 Thomas E. Ricks (P)2022 Macmillan Audio
  • Unabridged Audiobook
  • Categories: History

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The Sixties

I was a child during this history. This book refreshed my memories and reminded me of the energy of the time period. Younger folks ask me to describe my insights of that time. Now I have a book to direct them too. This is a great addition to other books This is the best I have read so far. A must read. Thank you Thomas Ricks!

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I was born and raised in Alabama. Jim Crow Era.

I remember George Wallace inaugural address on Segregation. I was 13 years old. my heart ❤️ felt like a cold steel stab my heart.
Bull Connor turns on his dogs and BFD fire hoses on young Black students. I lived 48 miles south east from Birmingham. Sylacauga was the transfer hubs for Trail way BusTerminal points South.
The saddest Month was September 16th Baptist Church Bombing where young Girls were killed attending Sunday School.
These So called white Christians ✝️ hiding behind a sheet with cut out known as KKK MURDEREDS INNOCENT CHRISTIAN CHILDREN ✝️.

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Revised The Times

Yeah I remember the struggles my mom trying to educate the people she worked with in Wilson and Elm City North Carolina when she told the white man he cheated the black sharecroper of change. They tried to kill her but they run her out of town.Great book of the truth.