• Washed and Waiting

  • Reflections on Christian Faithfulness and Homosexuality
  • By: Wesley Hill
  • Narrated by: Adam Black
  • Length: 4 hrs and 10 mins
  • 4.6 out of 5 stars (215 ratings)

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Washed and Waiting

By: Wesley Hill
Narrated by: Adam Black
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Publisher's Summary

This is a book written primarily for gay Christians and those who love them.

Part memoir, part pastoral-theological reflection, this book wrestles with three main areas of struggle that many gay Christians face:

(1) What is God's will for sexuality?

(2) If the historic Christian tradition is right and same-sex behavior is ruled out, how should gay Christians deal with their resulting loneliness?

(3) How can gay Christians come to an experience of grace that rescues them from crippling feelings of shame and guilt? Author Wesley Hill is not advocating that it is possible for every gay Christian to become straight, nor is he saying that God affirms homosexuality. Instead, Hill comes alongside gay Christians and says, "You are not alone. Here is my experience; it's like yours. And God is with us. We can share in God's grace."

While some authors profess a deep faith in Christ and claim a powerful experience of the Holy Spirit precisely in and through their homosexual practice, Hill's own story, by contrast, is a story of feeling spiritually hindered, rather than helped, by his homosexuality.

His story testifies that homosexuality was not God's original creative intention for humanity—that it is, on the contrary, a tragic sign of human nature and relationships being fractured by sin—and therefore that homosexual practice goes against God's express will for all human beings, especially those who trust in Christ.

©2010 Wesley Hill (P)2010 Zondervan

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A walk with a sinner in redemption

What did you love best about Washed and Waiting?

One of the things that I love best about Washed and Waiting is that this book exists. Hill explains the same challenge of trying to find books that describe an honest struggle of Christians dealing with homosexual bent while striving to be faithful to Christ's call in His Word. Hill is not deceived by the popular approach of our damaged culture that purports that one can be a faithful Christian and a practicing homosexual, nor is he deceived into thinking that his weakness has caused him to be damaged goods before a redeeming Christ. He clings tightly to Christ with an open heart interwoven with God's Word. A insightful, convicting and refreshing approach.

What did you like best about this story?

How it teaches all of us to approach our sin and Christ's work in our lives. Sin is dark and death. Christ's love is redemptive and resurrection. Therefore the unglorified Christian's walk is full of struggle and life.

What insight do you think you’ll apply from Washed and Waiting?

To have a greater hope for myself as a heterosexual Christian dealing with sin. And I will encourage other Christians, struggling with any sin, to consider the same truths that Hill points out about sin and our need for love. This story is for the Church.

Any additional comments?

As much as I appreciate Hill's perspective and story, inevitably I think Hill has a limited perspective of covenant life. Though subtle and indirect, his presentation of redemption throughout his life apart from covenant family seems to negate the richness that comes from the redemptive experience of a Christian marriage and family. I believe there is much more occurring with covenant family that Hill does not seem to see or has not experienced. Again, I can't imagine how he could see this since it is my assumption that he has never experienced it as a son, and has not been granted the opportunity to experience it as a husband and father. I feel certain that Hill longs for this knowledge, and I believe we all will see it most clearly in Glory.

2 people found this helpful

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Amazing book

This book was so eye opening and encouraging in so many ways. As a pastor wanting to understand the struggle many people go though this was a great book. It's not just a book to understand homosexuality but it is a great book to understand and see the struggle of any temptation.

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Knowing Personal Memoir

Don't read this book for a compelling exegesis of the Biblical text; Hill takes it for granted that homosexual sex is always sinful.

Do, however, read this book for a compelling and relatable memoir I'm which the author outlines his personal struggles with loneliness as a gay christian who has chosen to remain celibate.

I recommend reading this book alongside Justin Lee's book, "Torn: Rescuing the Gospel from the Gays VS Christians Debate", another memoir that discusses the place for Gay men and women in today's church.

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Surprised

I was honestly surprised by how much I liked this book. I read it at the advice of a friend and I learned quite a lot about the authors perspective. Even though I can’t empathize with him I can still understand his POV and apply it to my own life and the lives of the students I work with. I would definitely recommend it.

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highly recommended read

this book gave great insights into one of the most needed conversations for the church and Christians today. I understand that not all stories are the same and not all experiences have the same conclusions, but I could learn a lot from yours and it added much value to my life. thank you

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Awesome, insightful book

This is a great book for any christian to read. It's even helpful I'd think for anyone trying to imagine why some gay Christians are so self-repressive. Beautiful, hopeful, raw, and inspiring.

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Vulnerable and Enlightening

it takes a lot of courage and history of pain to write this kind of book. It takes a lot of trust too. i really appreciate all that. it's a gift to the church.

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so good

I took a long time but that was on me. especially the end where he unpacks C.S. Lewis' The Weight of Glory. just so great.

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Incredible...even the second and third time around

Wes Hill is telling a story that the church needs to hear... because it is a story of struggle that all of us can resonate with, whether we are part of an excluded community or not.

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Great thoughts

His story was encouraging to me and challenging. He considers himself a Christian who experiences homosexual attraction, but does not allow that to define him. The book goes through the struggle and shame he has experienced in his life so far. If you are looking for answers for yourself or a friend, this book doesn't have them. Instead, you will hear encouragement from a man zealous for Christ in the middle of his journey.