• Washington's End

  • The Final Years and Forgotten Struggle
  • By: Jonathan Horn
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 8 hrs and 14 mins
  • 4.0 out of 5 stars (445 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Popular historian and former White House speechwriter Jonathan Horn “provides a captivating and enlightening look at George Washington’s post-presidential life and the politically divided country that was part of his legacy” (New York Journal of Books). 

Beginning where most biographies of George Washington leave off, Washington’s End opens with the first president exiting office after eight years and entering what would become the most bewildering stage of his life. Embittered by partisan criticism and eager to return to his farm, Washington assumed a role for which there was no precedent at a time when the kings across the ocean yielded their crowns only upon losing their heads. In a different sense, Washington would lose his head, too. 

In this riveting listen, best-selling author Jonathan Horn reveals that the quest to surrender power proved more difficult than Washington imagined and brought his life to an end he never expected. The statesman who had staked his legacy on withdrawing from public life would feud with his successors and find himself drawn back into military command. The patriarch who had dedicated his life to uniting his country would leave his name to a new capital city destined to become synonymous with political divisions. 

A “movable feast of a book” (Jay Winik, New York Times best-selling author of 1944), immaculately researched, and powerfully told through the eyes not only of Washington, but also of his family members, friends, and foes, Washington’s End is “an outstanding biographical work on one of America’s most prominent leaders (Library Journal). 

©2020 Jonathan Horn (P)2020 Simon & Schuster Audio

What listeners say about Washington's End

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  • Overall
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INTRIGUING SNAPSHOT

With so much written and mythologized about the revolutionary Washington, it is refreshing to read about the post-apex person. Very human, it turns out, with regular worries and joys. Well-written and entertaining. It's equally fascinating how politics of this first post-presidency presaged today's atmosphere, with uncanny parallels over 200 years apart.

91 people found this helpful

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History repeats itself

This book is a reminder that we unite to attack an external enemy, then after defeating the external enemy, we attack one another. That is happening again right now. We are all biased. none of us are saints. Washington was biased . He was not a saint. This book is a reminder that despite pettiness and jealousy and personal ambitions of those in power, our nation continues to survive. That is good news for this troubling time in our history.

7 people found this helpful

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Washington's End

This autobiography is mostly about George Washington life from the end of his p[residency until his death which is a period of less than three years. It is interesting and worthwhile.

6 people found this helpful

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Not what I thought it would be

This book is definitely not what I thought it would be. However, the last 2+ hours were really good and focused on what the description laid out. The first portion of the book made me feel like I didn’t study for a pop quiz. It jumped around a lot and I had Trouble keeping up and understanding what timeline I was in. I would only recommend this book to people that have read several other books about Washington or detailed history books around the 20 years prior to his death.

4 people found this helpful

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Great history book

If for no other reason than to hear how the more things change, the more they stay the same, read or listen to this book. While giving an excellent view of life after the presidency for Washington, the political strife at the time is eye opening.

4 people found this helpful

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A Bunch of Men Overcome with their Own Self Importance

Everyone in the book, including Washington, is focused on their own reputation. I was embarrassed for all of them!

3 people found this helpful

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Things they don’t teach you in history class

While I had heard that excessive bleeding was considered one of the causes of his death. The idea he might have been saved by a tracheostomy is interesting. I can’t imagine that was a common procedure at the time.
The animosity between Washington and Jefferson was greater than I realized.
Abigail Adam’s observation that democracy would survive of her husband wasn’t re-elected seems to be echoed on a regular basis.
Perhaps why Mao was said to have observed out of too early to judge the impact of the French Revolution.

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Informative

Narrator too soft spoken would like more dynamic speaker
Interesting details about Washington and family




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A thorough and detailed coverage

Learn tidbits you don't know, explore other angles of intentions and actions of the founders, and enjoy a most interesting account of the early days of the nation.

I highly recommend this book.

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Outstanding historical lesson!

All aspects of this undertaking exceed my expectations. The authors research and composition opened my mind to the events and people who defined the birth of our nation and politics. A birds eye view of the personalities involved is the readers grand prize!