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Publisher's Summary

How do you make the workplace work for everyone? Acknowledging bias is the first step, but there’s so much more that anyone - leader or not - can do to ensure that all voices are heard and amplified, and that every member of the team can feel safe in and succeed in the workplace.

In this piece, speaker, author, and podcaster Minda Harts shares the ways in which anyone can contribute to building a truly equitable workplace culture. It starts with courageous leadership: not being afraid to start productive conversations around how to make things better when you witness discrimination. It continues with courageous listening, and then being a success partner in someone’s career. By sharing real tools anyone can use to fight workplace inequity, Harts guides us toward creating inclusive environments that have a positive impact on every employee.

Key takeaways:  

  • Why courage is essential for leaders who are trying to create an equitable culture in the workplace
  • How to become a courageous leader even if you’re not a manager
  • The difference between an ally and a success partner
  • How everyday actions - such as saying someone’s name in a meeting, recommending their work, or acknowledging a comment rooted in bias - can help make the workplace better for everybody

Minda Harts is the cofounder and CEO of The Memo LLC, a career development platform for women of color, and an adjunct assistant professor at NYU’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. She is the author of The Memo: What Women of Color Need to Know to Secure a Seat at the Table and Right Within: How to Heal From Racial Trauma in the Workplace and hosts the podcast Secure the Seat. She has been featured on MSNBC's Morning Joe and in Fast Company and speaks at Fortune 500 companies like Microsoft, Levi's, and Google. In 2020, she was named among BET's Future 40, and in 2018 she was named one of 25 Emerging Innovators by American Express.   

©2021 Audible (P)2021 Audible Originals, LLC.

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What listeners say about What It Means to Be a Courageous Leader

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So much Truth 🙂

loved it. Not just healing but reform of the work place needs to happen. Women of color are mistreated and disrespected on a daily.

1 person found this helpful

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Confusing headline to a great book

Thank you for this story. There was a lot of very good points to take away from this book. Having said that it was mentioned that it is important to give space to those who are in alliance with us, but the Author excluded the name of the person who was a great influence in her career. I understand that even writing this book took a ton of courage. This book is a great example of having courage. I recall many times having to be courageous to my supervisors and had to tell them my needs. But as the supervisor I am kind of loosing courage. people usually come to me when someone said something that hurt them and yes I go to the aggressor and question them about their actions and explain to them how it is unacceptable. But when you are already doing these things and you had courage as a staff member it is easy to loose that courage when your new supervisors now expect courage and try to protect the aggressors. I recently tried to write up an assistant manager for his foul comments and unacceptable behavior towards people facing discrimination. He was protected and I was terminated, apparently I was unprofessional. Thank you for reading this far and I hope it helps or inspires you or anyone to see that we all face alot of hardships and there are many of us out there that are not blind to it.

1 person found this helpful

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By Snowflakes for Snowflakes

Absolutely terrible commie trash. I wish I never wasted my time with this book here

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    2 out of 5 stars

Expectations unmet.

The expectation built from digesting the title of the book did not translate into its content. There was also a lack of systemic flow of the ideas and concepts of the author's interpretation of a 'Courageous Leader'.

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  • Al
  • 04-20-22

30 Minutes of Advertising

Message and content is fine, but it's basically self-promotional material. Free, but for the cost of your time.

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Lived experiences in the workplace

Taking action is the definition of a courageous leader. This hits home for most people of color.

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Good information

This was good information for not only people of color but for anyone looking to be a courageous and good leader. There were examples of what and what not to do.

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This isn't what I expected...

This was more centered on being a woman of color or a minority woman to learn how to be a courageous leader. Very misleading title. I wanted an open, unbiased, non-targeted book. This title and description should be revised.

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I can understand but...

Cultural Marxist CRT propaganda. Everyone having equal opportunity in a society is great. But Equity isn't Equality. Equity is a power grab. Advancing those ahead of others because of sex or color is never okay no matter the race. The most deserving candidate should be the one recognized. Also way should someone like me support this then this new age sex/race uplifting practices also discriminates against my own sex/race.

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misleading title

The book has nothing to do with leadership or courage. Not worth your time.

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  • Patrick Mwaba
  • 06-14-22

Insightful

One of the best books I have listened to on leadership. Covers the most important traits a leader needs in a diverse and all inclusive work place.

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  • Pavlos
  • 05-18-22

Not so educational

Author speaks for the obvious common sense of speaking up when something goes wrong.
Why people don’t defend other people.
Ends up on my end that the book is mostly for communication reasons / purposes and not being an actual courageous leader.
At least from my perspective!