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Publisher's Summary

On a sunny day in Berkeley, California, in 1942, a woman sees a sign in a post office window, returns to her house, and matter-of-factly begins to pack her family's possessions. Like thousands of other Japanese Americans, they have been reclassified virtually overnight as enemy aliens, and they are about to be uprooted from their home and sent to a dusty internment camp in the Utah desert.

In this lean and devastatingly evocative first novel, Julie Otsuka tells their story from five flawlessly realized points of view and conveys the exact emotional texture of their experience: the thin-walled barracks and barbed-wire fences, the omnipresent fear and loneliness, the unheralded feats of heroism.

When the Emperor Was Divine is a work of enormous power that makes a shameful episode of our history as immediate as today's headlines.

©2003 Julie Otsuka (P)2003 Random House, Inc., Random House Audio, A Division of Random House, Inc.

Critic Reviews

  • Alex Award Winner, 2003

"Exceptional...Otsuka skillfully dramatizes a world suddenly foreign...[Her] incantatory, unsentimental prose is the book's greatest strength." (The New Yorker)
"The novel's honesty and matter-of-fact tone in the face of inconceivable injustice are the source of its power." (Publishers Weekly)
"Mesmerizing." (The New York Times)

Featured Article: 10 Audiobooks to Listen to on the Day of Remembrance


In 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, mandating the removal of Japanese Americans from their homes. Nearly 120,000 Japanese immigrants and native born Japanese Americans were imprisoned in concentration camps for the duration of World War II. We need to bear witness to the atrocities committed by the United States government and the pain our leadership caused innocent men, women, and children of Japanese heritage.

What listeners say about When the Emperor Was Divine

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent

Fascinating book, couldn't wait to drive home to turn on the ipod and listen.
A classic

4 people found this helpful

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Narrator

I'm not sure I would have appreciated fully the power and beauty of this story if not for the narrators incredible performance. Loved her voice in telling this

3 people found this helpful

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Human nature is to stereotype

Hard to resist the leap to compare this to the more recent horror of 9/11. How it must feel to be of Middle Eastern decent today. How it must have felt to be Japanese back then.
I do not say this to offend anyone, it could be said of any of us that someone of our race or country has done unthinkable things.
I think high school students would benefit from reading this book. Thank you

1 person found this helpful

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Executive Order 9066- Japanese Internment

Julie Otsuka's book takes the reader into the lives of a small Japanese American family as they are 'evacuated' and interned in a camp throughout World War two and then on to their return to civilization after the war. The story with bring tears, anger, questions, and greater vision to the reader. The author dealt with this delicate subject with great dignity and grace. The journey taken was enlightening and the imagery used throughout was insightful and memorable. Best book club read of the year.

1 person found this helpful

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Amazing 😉 wow 😳

Must read for diversity. Trauma and a different perspective of another culture for stereotypes and biases that are so commonly accepted. Now seen from a wonderfully told story of the another story less heard and shared in common society

1 person found this helpful

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Moving

It is a shame that some schools are banning this book in the United States. We need to learn our history, all of it , or we will repeat it.

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fascinating story

Muskego school decided not to use this book in a literature class. The news article named the book. So, I searched for it here and listened to it.

I found the story fascinating.

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powerful and simple

Powerful book. Her narration speaks volumes with few words. The story is beautiful and tragic. we visited Ft. Missoula after reading this and they have all but buried this portion of history.

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Poignant

Upon begining the book, I foolishly believed that it was a slow build story. The kind that drips slowly ever drawing you in but I confess, I was sorely mistaken. From the first page you realize that the story lies in all that is not said. That's the real heart of the novel. I can't wait to reread it and taken in all that I missed the first time. Its definitely a must read.

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Let's Discuss Racism...

I disliked this story. The final chapter "Confession" was especially racist. Good job confirming that all white people are racists, all Japanese are the stereotypes everyone jokes about, America is the slum you have always thought it was Julie... thanks for wasting my time Professor...