• Why Kids Kill

  • Inside the Minds of School Shooters
  • By: Peter Langman PhD
  • Narrated by: Matthew Josdal
  • Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (109 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

Ten years after the school massacre at Columbine High School in Colorado, school shootings are a new and alarming epidemic. While sociologists have attributed the trigger of violence to peer pressure, such as bullying and social isolation, prominent psychologist Peter Langman, argues here that psychological causes are responsible.  

Drawing on 20 years of clinical experience, Langman offers surprising reasons for why some teens become violent. Langman divides shooters into three categories, and he discusses the role of personality, trauma, and psychosis among school shooters.  

From examining the material evidence of notorious school shooters at Columbine and Virginia Tech to addressing the mental states of the violent youths he treats, Langman shows how to identify early signs of homicide-prone youth and what preventive measures educators, parents, and communities can take to protect themselves from the tragedy.  

Contains mature themes.

©2009 Peter Langman, PhD (P)2018 Tantor

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What listeners say about Why Kids Kill

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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the reading was monotone

reading was monotone so it was hard to be engaged. I wish he had talked more about the trauma type, because for the other two type he was clearer about the difference for the motivations to go on rampage to the school.

1 person found this helpful

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Reader is annoying

This reader’s voice and intonation made the book very hard to enjoy. His over pronouncing of words is grating.

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Interesting, but frustrating.

Interesting points and information. I was annoyed to know end by the overuse of the word “thus” along with the way the narrator held vowel sounds in short words such as “thus” and “but”… both of which were frequently used. The way charts were read made them impossible to understand unless you write down the columns and rows as they’re read.

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Great Book Bad Narration

This book is great. Has a lot of good information and it’s quite interesting. The narrator bugs me though. Very monotone and strange. I can’t really describe it. If you can look past that then I highly recommend this one!

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Excellent!

A must read for anyone who enjoys studying school shooters. Excellent read for school officials.

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Too much about Columbine

I thought this would be about others post Columbine. At least the beginning of every chapter goes on and on about Eric Harris. We all know every detail about him I was hoping for some insight through others but was dis a pointed. But still I listened from start to finish so it does keep ones attention.

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better paired w/nonfiction school shooting book

it's an interesting book, in that it dissects to whatever degree, or limited degree, several child school shooters. this book might be better paired with other books of the school shootings, to give the reader a bigger picture (i.e. read the columbine books along with the sections of this book that deals with columbine).
it is my opinion, that even with the most intelligent insightful mind, and the best psychological degree, all the experience of interviewing and dissecting murders (child or not), you may never get to the truth of why someone does what they do. not just because of your own ability to understand and perceive but also because the individuals themselves may not really comprehend, or be able to bring into consciousness the "WHY" of it. added to that mix, is the ability to deceive, shade truths, or choose not to divulge.

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  • A random person
  • 06-07-22

Vaguely interesting, odd narration

It’s an interesting topic in the current climate, but the author uses a lot of repetition and often states the blindingly obvious. Worse, though, is the narrator who speaks with a very strange rhythm and ends sentences on an odd tone. He tends to end sentences with “Howeverrrrr” with a rising tone, as if there’s something to follow on. It’s very distracting.

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