• You Shall Know Our Velocity

  • By: Dave Eggers
  • Narrated by: Dion Graham
  • Length: 11 hrs and 22 mins
  • 3.6 out of 5 stars (107 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

In his first novel, Dave Eggers has written a moving and hilarious tale of two friends who fly around the world trying to give away a lot of money and free themselves from a profound loss. It reminds us once again what an important, necessary talent Dave Eggers is.

©2003 Dave Eggers (P)2010 Recorded Books, LLC

What listeners say about You Shall Know Our Velocity

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

A delightful listen

Really touching and laugh out loud at the same time. Eggers strikes a wonderful balance between serious and seriously funny here. The superb narrator never gets in the way of this journey, his subtle but well defined details of anxiety and sadness while looking at the world at large brings everything into perspective. Highly recommended! Especially if you need a laugh.

6 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Holden Caufield travels the world

There were some really fun moments in this story, chasing donkeys and climbing trees, it makes me think of 12 year old boys traveling as adults.

That immaturity and naive fun gets old though when you are trapped in the angst ridden mind of the main character.

Dian Graham is not my favorite narrator and I think my annoyance with Will didn't help.

I enjoyed this book though, I think it's worth listening to, it's just not my favorite Eggers, which I think makes me judge it more harshly.

3 people found this helpful

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Childish without the usual humour of Eggers

Didn't really enjoy it. Too many times it just felt like the main characters were children. I can't tell of the writing or the narration was poor bc too many times it was confusing if the main character was talking to someone or Kirsty talking to them in his head. I really loved egger's first couple of books but I've now read this and the circle and I think they will be my last from him.

1 person found this helpful

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  • R
  • 02-28-17

Thin Premise for Novel Flogged to Death

Listening to this, I felt like Bill Murray in Groundhog Day, again and again experiencing the same events. I don't understand how the author didn't get bored writing this book, with its endlessly looping plot line. What made it worse is that the premise — two young guys randomly giving away a small fortune to people in poor countries — is interesting and thought provoking maybe for five pages.

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Profile Image for Christopher Whalen
  • Christopher Whalen
  • 09-30-22

Trauma, travel, time, and money

Two friends go on a week-long trip around the world in an attempt to spend and give away $32,000. The driving narrative is intercut with flashbacks to a recent trauma. Eggers creates a wonderful sense of elastic and unreal time. As with “A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius”, there’s a sometimes stressful forward motion, of time running out and urgency. The narration by Dion Graham is good at the different voices and mostly held my attention.