1 title per month from Audible’s entire catalog of best sellers, and new releases.
Access a growing selection of included Audible Originals, audiobooks and podcasts.
You will get an email reminder before your trial ends.
Your Premium Plus plan is $14.95 a month after 30 day trial. Cancel anytime.
Buy for $19.59

Buy for $19.59

Pay using card ending in
By confirming your purchase, you agree to Audible's Conditions of Use and Amazon's Privacy Notice. Taxes where applicable.

Publisher's Summary

It's time to come out of hiding.

Frey has spent her life in a family of deceivers, a stand-in for her sister, manipulated at her father's command. Free from them at last, she is finding her own voice - and using it to question everything her family stood for.

Tally was once the most famous rebel in the world. But for over a decade, she's kept to the shadows, allowing her myth to grow even as she receded. Now she sees that the revolution she led has not created a stable world. Freedom, she observes, has a way of destroying things.

As the world is propelled further into conflict and conspiracy, Frey and Tally join forces to put a check on the people in power, while still trying to understand their own power and where it belongs.

With Youngbloods, master storyteller Scott Westerfeld decisively brings back his most iconic character and merges his Impostors and Uglies series into a breathtaking tale of rivalry, rebellion, and repercussion. 

©2022 Scott Westerfeld (P)2022 Scholastic Audio

What listeners say about Youngbloods

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    53
  • 4 Stars
    16
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    54
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    42
  • 4 Stars
    14
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

heartbreaking and beautiful

never felt so complete after a story. this world is broken and dysfunctional in the most raw and real and beautiful way. I'm so proud of the characters and how far they have come. I loved this book. it might not have been the ending I wanted, with Cole gone. but it was beautiful none the less.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Satisfying wrap up

This seems to be the conclusion of the latest trilogy, and it wraps up in a satisfying way.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Great book with a lame ending.

My only gripe was that the ending didn't feel like it was natural. Almost felt rushed even. I hope there will be just one more in the Uglies universe to tie up everything including Extras.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Frey...Book 1-4: From Good to 'Ehh, Who Cares?'

Frey started out in Book One by breaking out of a guarded house with simple items. She was clever, direct, subtle, and quick thinking.

From there, we watch Frey get led by the nose everywhere she went. She was a girl with a magic knife.

At the end of Book One, Frey risks everything to rescue her sister.
When Frey tells her sister that she'll be with her soon, after she rescue her Love from execution, Rafi throws a fit and says Frey is being disloyal unless she lets the guy die.

In Book Two Rafi steals the only other thing Frey has ever had, which is her name and reputation.
When Frey finally meets up with Rafi, Rafi isn't happy to see her -- she's pissed.
She is condescending and calculating on letting Frey know just how much Frey is in the wrong for trying to find her, and especially for trying to find out why Rafi has stolen Frey's name and reputation.
Aside from the talking down to her, Rafi barely talks to Frey, who's gone above and beyond to be with her sister. And Frey doesn't do a thing about it.

Then Book Three -- Rafi is clearly treating Frey like she's nothing but hired help and shouldn't be told anything.
Bottom line, Frey almost gets killed in a half a dozen ways, and risks her health and a lot of pain to ensure a bunch of people aren't getting poisoned.
Then at the last minute, Rafi joins the assault on Daddy Central, and to distract Daddy and win the proverbial day, Rafi uses a pulse knife (that she had magically learned to use as well as Frey, who basically slept with one under her pillow for 15 years), and she jams it through Cole's heart.
Later, she says that it was simply the only thing she could have done to distract Daddy for the moments she needed to win.
-- No chance she could have angled the magic blade at the last second so that the blade traveled along his ribs instead of into his heart?
-- Nor could she have reversed the blade so he was hit with the hilt at velocity, making it momentarily look like he was killed and knocked off his feet?
-- And the same two strategies wouldn't have worked even better if aimed at the stronger Frey?
All she needs is a distraction for 1-2 seconds, but she even gets Frey thinking that nothing but a kill shot would have worked.
Seriously?

And in Book Four we are back to hearing that Rafi absolutely wants Frey beside her (though, not as Frey, because Rafi has stolen that name already, good and proper).

Yet Frey is still questioning whether a few nice words from Rafi can make Frey want to stay with her sister?
Perhaps Frey doesn't believe she has anything else Rafi can take by backstabbing her... again.

Frey started out great. A loving sister, independent in her own right, and able to make things happen instead of simply reacting to situations over and over.

Tally asks Frey something along the lines of "Did Rafi really backstab you, or were you simply outplayed?"
And Frey has to stop and think about it.

Let me help. Frey didn't get outplayed, because Frey wasn't playing. She wasn't in the game. Didn't know there was a game. She thought they were all white water rafting and were all in the same raft.
Frey didn't notice that she was the only one not in a cayak... the only one without paddles... the only one who was just letting the river take her where it willed, looking up at the stars and wondering why bad stuff keeps happening to her.

At the end, I really couldn't care less what Frey did, nor Rafi.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

phenominal

I'm so happy I could ride with Tally and Shay again, with Frey. a wonderful end, everything I could've dreamed of and more, thank you Scott Westerfeld